Genesis and Geology: A Study in the Relations of Scientific Thought, Natural Theology, and Social Opinion in Great Britain, 1790-1850, Volume 58

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Harvard University Press, 1951 - History - 315 pages
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First published in 1951, Genesis and Geology describes the background of social and theological ideas and the progress of scientific researches which, between them, produced the religious difficulties that afflicted the development of science in early industrial England. The book makes clear that the furor over On the Origin of Species was nothing new: earlier discoveries in science (particularly geology) had presented major challenges, not only to the literal interpretation of the Book of Genesis, but even more seriously to the traditional idea that Providence controls the order of nature with an eye to fulfilling divine purpose. A new Foreword by Nicolaas A. Rupke places this book in the context of the last forty-five years of scholarship in the social history of evolutionary thought.

 

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Contents

THROUGH NATURE UP TO NATURES GOD
3
NEPTUNE AND THE FLOOD
41
FROM VULCANISM TO PALEONTOLOGY
73
CATASTROPHIST GEOLOGY
98
THE UNIFORMITY OF NATURE
121
THE VESTIGES OF CREATION
149
How USEFUL Is THY DWELLING PLACE
184
THE PLACE OF PROVIDENCE IN NATURE
217
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
231
NOTES
261
INDEX
305
Copyright

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About the author (1951)

Nicolaas A. Rupke is Professor and Director, Institute for the History of Science, Göttingen University.

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