Norfolk Archaeology

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Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, 1872 - Norfolk (England)
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Page 316 - October in the tenth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith etc, and in the year of our Lord God One thousand seven hundred and twenty three.
Page 338 - Formerly, when deeds were more concise than at present, it was usual to write both parts on the same piece of parchment, with some word or letters of the alphabet written between them ; through which the parchment was cut, either in a straight or indented line, in such a manner as to leave half the word on one part and half on the other.
Page 70 - ... taken down, there doth yet remain altars, standing in divers other churches ; by occasion whereof much variance and contention ariseth amongst sundry of our subjects, which, if good foresight were not had, might perhaps engender great hurt and inconvenience.
Page 170 - He did not perceive that although the name might have been given by the Saxons, the earthworks were here long before their arrival. He speaks of Grimes Graves as " a very curious Danish encampment," containing " great numbers of large deep pits, joined in a regular manner, one near to another, in form of a quincunx, the largest seeming to be in the centre, where probably the general's or commander's tent was.
Page 122 - At the north end of the high altar there was a very fine lettem of hrass, where they sung the Epistle and Gospel, with a great Pelican on the height of it, finely gilt, billing the blood out of her breast to feed her young ones...
Page 122 - Micron of brass, where they sung the Epistle and Gospel, with a great Pelican on the height of it, finely gilt, billing her blood out of her breast to feed her young ones, and her wings spread abroad, whereon lay the book also there was lower down in the quire another...
Page 315 - To all and every our Right Worshipful, Worshipful and loving Brethren, now residing or who may hereafter reside in the Provinces of New York, New Jersey and...
Page 44 - ... carousing cups of the sacred chalices, as once Belshazzar celebrated his drunken feast in the sanctified vessels of the Temple.
Page 291 - Elizabeth's hands, who was often here : she it was that ordered her tenant Chapman, who then lived in Fersfield Lodge, to lay out the way now called Chapman's Entry, out of her own ground, the old way being so strait that the Queen could not conveniently pass through it : it is now disused, and is called Queen Bess's Lane, from her being scratched with the brambles in riding through it, as tradition tells us.
Page 141 - the true value of small livings not exceeding 50 per annum, as they were lately returned into Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer in order to their discharge from payment of first-fruits and tenths...

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