Plutarch’s Science of Natural Problems: A Study with Commentary on Quaestiones Naturales

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Leuven University Press, Feb 15, 2017 - Philosophy - 556 pages
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The role of natural science in the Roman Imperial Era

In hisQuaestiones naturales, Plutarch unmistakably demonstrates a huge interest in the world of natural phenomena. The work of this famous intellectual and philosopher from Chaeronea consists of forty-one natural problems that address a wide variety of questions, sometimes rather peculiar ones, pertaining to ancient Greek physics, including problems related to the fields of zoology, botany, meteorology and their respective subdisciplines.

By providing a thorough study of and commentary on this generally neglected text, written by one of the most influential and prolific writers from Antiquity, this book contributes to our better understanding of Plutarch’s natural scientific programme and the condition and role of ancient natural science in the Roman Imperial Era in general.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
11
PROLOGUE
13
the case of Quaestiones naturales
15
PART I INTRODUCTION
59
1 Problems problems problems and Aristotelian precedents
61
2 The position of Quaestiones naturales in the corpus Plutarcheum
131
3 Quaestiones naturales and zetetic παιδεία
187
the aetiological design of Quaestiones naturales and its scientific context
235
2 Wheat and barley QN 1416
420
3 Sea animals and fishing QN 1719
425
4 Land animals and hunting QN 2028
437
5 Viniculture QN 3031
464
6 Longolius QN 3239
469
7 Psellus QN 4041
487
Synopsis
492
Bibliography
495

PART II COMMENTARY
365
0 Approach and structure
367
1 Salt and water QN 113
368
INDEX LOCORUM
529
Index Locorum
531
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Michiel Meeusen is British Academy Postdoctoral Research Associate at King’s College London, Department of Classics.

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