Pottery and Porcelain: A Guide to Collectors

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Truslove, Hanson & Comba, 1900 - Porcelain - 362 pages
 

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p. 151 Six pointed star of a Fiance maker.; p. 127 Delft marks x 4 pages;

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Great book! Many, many marks identified here, that I couldn't find elsewhere. A Great Read if interested in pottery & porcelain history! I do wish I had found this before selling some of the things I have sold....

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Page 312 - ... 4. Jasper ; a white porcelain biscuit of exquisite beauty and delicacy, possessing the general properties of the basaltes, together with the singular one of receiving through its whole substance, from the admixture of metallic calces with the other...
Page 84 - The patent was for a new method of manufacturing a certain material, whereby a ware might be made of the same nature and kind, and equal to, if not exceeding in goodness and beauty, china and porcelain ware imported from abroad.
Page 312 - Jeuper; a white porcelain biscuit of exquisite beauty and delicacy, possessing the general properties of the basaltes, together with the singular one of receiving through its whole substance, from the admixture of metallic calces with the other materials, the same colours which those calces communicate to glass or enamels in fusion ; a property which no other porcelain or earthenware body of ancient or modern composition has been found to possess. This renders it peculiarly fit for making cameos,...
Page 316 - ... to harmonise the two. To have a strong grasp of this principle, and to work it out to its results in the details of a vast and varied manufacture, is a praise, high enough for any man, at any time, and in any place. But it was higher and more peculiar, as I think, in the case of Wedgwood, than in almost any other case it could be. For that truth of Art, which he saw so clearly, and which lies at the root of excellence, was one, of which England, his country, has not usually had a perception at...
Page 316 - I need hardly say, substitute the secondary for the primary end, but which recognises, as part of the business of production, the study to harmonise the two. To have a strong grasp of this principle, and to work it out to its results in the details of a vast and varied manufacture, is a praise, high enough for any man, at any time, and in any place. But it was higher and more peculiar, as I think, in the case of "Wedgwood, than in almost any other case it could be.
Page 316 - ... the law which teaches us to aim first at giving to every object the greatest possible degree of fitness and convenience for its purpose, and next at making it the vehicle of the highest degree of Beauty which, compatibly with that of fitness and convenience, it will bear ; which does not substitute the secondary for the primary end, but which recognises, as part of the business of production, the study to harmonise the two.
Page 96 - I went to view the magnificent manufactory of china. After admiring all the fine things, sufficient to seduce the money from my pocket, I came to some busts in china of all the Royal Family : these I immediately ordered, and, when I wanted to pay for them, I was informed that the King had directed whatever I chose should be delivered free of all cost : it was handsome in the King.
Page 316 - England has long taken a lead among the nations of Europe for the cheapness of her manufactures ; and Mr. Gladstone believes that if the day is ever to come when she shall be as eminent in true taste and beauty as she is now in economy of production, that result will probably be due to no other single man in so great a degree as to Wedgwood. In the words of his epitaph, he
Page 315 - Industrial Art, or in other words, of the application of the higher Art to Industry ; the law which teaches us to aim first at giving to every object the greatest possible degree of fitness and convenience for its purpose, and next at making it the vehicle of the highest degree of Beauty which...
Page 46 - ... quality or habit which connects the sense of beauty with the production of works of utility. ' With the English those two things are quite distinct ; but in the oldest times of human industry — that is to say, amongst the Greeks — there was no separation whatever, no gap at all, between the idea of beauty and the idea of utility. Whatever the ancient Greek produced he made as useful as he could ; and at the same time a cardinal law with him was to make it as beautiful as he could.

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