Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical and Discursive

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J. Murray, 1903 - British - 1021 pages
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Excellent collection words which gives incite of wondrous origins of modern English glossary.

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Brilliant Book

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Page 330 - It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy; yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, for it is perfect as it is.
Page 66 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 492 - Yes, honour calls! — with strength like steel He put the vision by. Let dusky Indians whine and kneel; An English lad must die. And thus, with eyes that would not shrink, With knee to man unbent, Unfaltering on its dreadful brink, To his red grave he went. Vain, mightiest fleets of iron framed; Vain, those all-shattering guns ; Unless proud England keep, untamed, The strong heart of her sons. So, let his name through Europe ring — A man of mean estate, Who died, as firm as Sparta's king, Because...
Page xl - HIBBERT LECTURES ON THE ORIGIN AND GROWTH OF RELIGION, as illustrated by the Religions of India.
Page 66 - Some on the lower boughs which crossed their way, Fixing their bearded fibres round and round, With many a ring and wild contortion wound; Some to the passing wind, at times, with sway Of gentle motion swung; Others, of younger growth, unmoved, were hung Like stone-drops from the cavern's fretted height...
Page 366 - A Code of Gentoo Laws, or. Ordinations of the Pundits. From a Persian Translation...
Page 435 - And upon the beasts were there strong towers of wood, which covered every one of them, and were girt fast unto them with devices: there were also upon every one two and thirty strong men, that fought upon them, beside the Indian that ruled him.
Page 492 - Some Seiks, and a private of the Buffs, having remained behind with the grog-carts, fell into the hands of the Chinese. On the next morning they were brought before the authorities, and commanded to perform the kotou.
Page 430 - Khalifahs, or legitimate Successors, as his representatives in both capacities. It is also given — in its religious import only — to the heads of the four orthodox sects...
Page 322 - And when they have to be loaded, they kneel like the camel; once the load is adjusted, they rise. Their load is a heavy one, for they are very strong animals. Then there are sheep here as big as asses; and their tails are so large and fat, that one tail shall weigh some 30 Ibs. They are fine fat beasts, and afford capital mutton.

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