The History of Russia: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. Compiled from the Most Authentic Sources, Including the Works of Karamsin, Tooke, and Ségur, Volume 2

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H. G. Bohn, 1855 - Russia
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Page 426 - We cannot resuscitate what is dead; if the Turkish empire falls, it falls to rise no more ; and I put it to you, therefore, whether it is not better to be provided beforehand for a contingency, than* to incur the chaos, confusion, and the certainty of a European war, all of which must attend the catastrophe if it should occur unexpectedly, and before some ulterior system has been sketched.
Page 422 - ... adding that he trusted the ministry would be of long duration. His imperial majesty desired me particularly to convey this assurance to the Earl of Aberdeen, with whom, he said, he had been acquainted for nearly forty years, and for whom he entertained equal regard and esteem. His majesty desired to be brought to the kind recollection of his lordship. " ' You know my feelings," the emperor said,
Page 488 - On the right, and a little retired, was a powerful covered battery armed with heavy guns, which flanked the whole of the right of the position. Artillery, at the same time, was posted at the points that best commanded the passage of the river and its approaches generally. On the slopes of these hills (forming a sort of table land) were placed dense masses of the enemy's infantry, whilst on the heights above Was his great reserve, the whole amounting, it is supposed, to between 45,000 and 50,00ti...
Page 492 - ... but the next, and the next, and the next, cut through the ranks so cleanly, and so keenly, that a clear lane could be seen for a moment through the square. After a few rounds the columns of the square became broken, wavered to and fro, broke, and fled over the brow of the hill, leaving behind them six or seven distinct lines of dead, lying as close as possible to each other, marking the passage of the fatal messengers. This act relieved our infantry of a deadly incubus, and they continued their...
Page 492 - Yes", and an artillery officer, whose name I do not now know, brought up two guns to fire on the Russian squares. The first shot missed, but the next, and the next, and the next cut through the ranks so cleanly and so keenly, that a clear lane could be seen for a moment through the square. After a few rounds the columns of the square became broken, wavered to and fro, broke, and fled over the brow of the hill, leaving behind them six or seven distinct lines of dead, lying as close as possible to...
Page 353 - Turkey the acceptance of the protocol of the 22nd of March, which secured to her the suzerainete of Greece, and a yearly tribute from that country ; Russia used all her influence to procure the independence of Greece, and the violation by herself and her allies of the agreement which she had made an integral part of the treaty of Adrianople. Greece was finally separated from Turkey, and erected into an independent state; of which Count Capo d'Istria, who had been a Russian minister, was named president.
Page 425 - Her Majesty's Government should not allow themselves to be fettered. The dilemma seems to be this: — if Her Majesty's Government do not come to an understanding with Russia as to what is to happen in the event of the sudden downfall of Turkey, they will have the less reason for complaining, if results displeasing to England should be prepared. If, on the contrary, Her Majesty's Government should enter into the consideration of such eventualities, they make themselves in some degree consenting parties...
Page 426 - Close to us lies Turkey, and, in our present condition, nothing better for our interests can be desired ; the times have gone by when we had anything to fear from the fanatical spirit or the military enterprise of the Turks, and yet the country is strong enough, or has hitherto been strong enough, to preserve its independence, and to insure respectful treatment from other countries.
Page 156 - You are a pitiful scoundrel like himself," said he. " Let him overturn the carriage ; let him break my neck ; but let him obey me, and turn the instant I command him." During the dispute the coachman succeeded in turning, but Paul had him chastised on the spot. Since his accession, one of his horses stumbled with him in one of the streets of St. Petersburg...
Page 191 - There it will find a Russian army of 35,000 men, composed of 15,000 infantry, 10,000 cavalry, and 10,000 Cossacks, amply provided with artillery and the horses necessary for its conveyance. " The combined army shall be transported by the Caspian Sea, from Astrakan to Astrabat, where magazines of all sorts shall be established for its use.

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