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Books Books 1 - 10 of 59 on That, not I, but, since I love you, Time and place for me may move you. 'Never season....
" That, not I, but, since I love you, Time and place for me may move you. 'Never season was more fit, Never room more apt for it; Smiling air allows my reason; These birds sing, "Now use the season." 'This small wind, which so sweet is, See how it the leaves... "
The British bibliographer - Page 102
by Sir Egerton Brydges - 1810
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Specimens of the Early English Poets, Volume 2

English poetry - 1790 - 323 pages
...feafon," This fmall wind, which fo fvveet is, See how it the leaves doth kHs ; And, if dumb things be fo witty, Shall a heavenly grace want pity ?" There, his hands, in their fpeech, fain Would have made tongue's language plain : But her hands, his hands repelling, Gave repulfe...
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Specimens of the early English poets [ed. by G. Ellis.]. To which is ...

English poets - 1801
...sing, ' now use the season/ " This small wind, which so sweet u, " See how it the leaves doth kiss ; " And, if dumb things be so witty, " Shall a heavenly grace want pity r" There, his hands, in their speech, fain Would have made tongue's language plain ; But her hands,...
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Specimens of the early English poets: to which is prefixed an ..., Volume 1

George Ellis - English poetry - 1803 - 458 pages
...S1DNEV. 151 " This small wind, which so sweet is, " See how it the leaves doth kiss ; • ••»»• " And, if dumb things be so witty, " Shall a heavenly...Would have made tongue's language plain ; But her hands, his hands repelling, * Gave repulse all grace excelling. * Then 3 she spake ; her speech was...
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The lyre of love [ed. by P.L. Courtier].

Lyre - 1806
...air allows my reason, " This small wind, which so sweet is*y " See, how it the leaves doth kiss! " Each tree, in his best attiring, " Sense of love to love inspiring." There his hand, in their speech, fain Would have made tongue's language plain ; But her hands, his...
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Specimens of the British poets

British poets - 1809
...sing, " now use the season," This small wind, which so sweet is, See bow it the leaves doth kiss ; And, if dumb things be so witty, Shall a heavenly grace want pity f • There, his hands, in their speech, fain Would have made tongue's language plain ; Bat her hands,...
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Specimens of the early English poets [ed. by G. Ellis.]. To which is ...

English poets - 1811
...1691, " prow." '• This small wind, which so sweet is, " See how it the leaves doth kiss ; ****** " And if dumb things be so witty, " Shall a heavenly...Would have made tongue's language plain ; But her hands, his hands repelling, * Gave repulse all grace excelling. * Then 3 she spake ; her speech was...
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A new universal etymological technological, and pronouncing dictionary of ...

John Craig (F.G.S.) - 1848
...head-dress ; dress in general This small wind, which so sweet is, He« how it the leaves doth kiss, Each tree, in his best attiring ; Sense of love to love inspiring ¡—/Sidney. ATTTTLE, at-ti'tl, ta (altUulare, low Lat.) To entitle; to name. — Obsolete. This Aries,...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Sir Philip Sidney, Knt: With a Life of the Author ...

Sir Philip Sidney, William Gray - 1860 - 380 pages
...birds sing, " Now use the season." This small wind, which so sweet is, See how it the leaves doth kiss, Each tree in his best attiring, Sense of love to love...water sink ; And, if dumb things be so witty, Shall a heav'nly grace want pity ? There his hands, in their speech, fain Would have made tongue's language...
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The Miscellaneous Works of Sir Philip Sidney, Knt: With a Life of the Author ...

Sir Philip Sidney, William Gray - 1860 - 380 pages
...the water drink ; Love to earth makes water sink ; And, if dumb things be so witty, Shall a heav'nly grace want pity ? There his hands, in their speech,...Would have made tongue's language plain ; But her hands, his hands repelling, Gave repulse all grace excelling. Then she spake ; her speech was such,...
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An English Garner: Ingatherings from Our History and Literature, Volume 1

Edward Arber - English literature - 1877
...sing : now use the season ! " " This small wind which so sweet is, See how it the leaves doth kiss ! Each tree in his best attiring, Sense of love to love...Would have made tongue's language plain : But her hands, his hands repelling, Gave repulse, all grace excelling. The eight following stanzas are omitted...
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