Foreign Communities in Hong Kong, 1840s–1950s

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Springer, Oct 6, 2005 - History - 209 pages
This collection of essays describes adaptations of minority ethnic groups to cross-cultural situations in Hong Kong from the 1840s through the 1950s. It aims to portray Hong Kong history through the perspectives of foreign communities - the British, Germans, Americans, Indians and Japanese - and to understand how they perceived the economic situation, political administration and culture of the colony.
 

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User Review  - RebeccaGraf - LibraryThing

Everyone knows of Hong Kong. Many of us remember Hong Kong before it went back to the Chinese. How many of us really know about the development of British Hong Kong? Very few. That is why Cindy Yik-yi ... Read full review

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Early Beginnings of British Community 18411898
17
3 British Attitudes toward Hong Kong in the Nineteenth Century
39
4 NineteenthCentury German Community
60
5 Catholic Church between Two World Wars
85
6 Making of a Japanese Community in Prewar Period 18411941
110
7 Stanley Civilian Internment Camp during Japanese Occupation
133
8 Migrants from India and Their Relations with British and Chinese Residents
155
9 American China Hands in the 1950s
171
Suggestions for Further Reading
195
Index
201
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About the author (2005)

Cindy Yik-yi Chu is a Professor in the Department of History at Hong Kong Baptist University.

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