Battles of the British Navy, Volume 1

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H.G. Bohn, 1852 - Great Britain - 604 pages
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Page 447 - At this moment, a Spanish officer looked over the quarter-deck rail, and said they surrendered. From this most welcome intelligence, it was not long before I was on the quarter-deck; where the Spanish captain, with a bow, presented me his sword, and said the admiral was dying of his wounds.
Page 485 - Baron Nelson of the Nile and of Burnham Thorpe, in the County of Norfolk...
Page 447 - I gave him my hand, and desired him to call on his officers and ship's company, and tell them of it, which he did ; and on the quarter-deck of a Spanish first-rate, extravagant as the story may seem, did...
Page 447 - I found Captain Berry in possession of the poop, and the Spanish ensign hauling down. I passed with my people and Lieutenant Pearson, on the larboard gangway, to the forecastle, where I met two or three Spanish officers prisoners to my seamen — they delivered me their swords.
Page 447 - ... and, on the quarterdeck of a Spanish first-rate, extravagant as the story may seem, did I receive the swords of vanquished Spaniards; which, as I received, I gave to William Fearney, one of my bargemen; who put them, with the greatest sang,froid, under his arm.
Page 47 - ... will ensue dangers and disorders of boarding one another, insomuch that it will not be possible for a general to give new directions, but every ship must fight at its will, not by command. " For the avoiding of such confusion, the instructions of a general ought not to consist of many words ; for the greatest advantage in a sea-fight is to get the wind of one another ; for he that has the wind is out of danger of being boarded, and has the advantage where to board, and how to attempt the enemy...
Page 447 - ... on the quarter-deck of a Spanish first-rate, extravagant as the story may seem, did I receive the swords of the vanquished Spaniards ; which, as I received, I gave to William Fearney, one of my bargemen, who put them, with the greatest sang-froid, under his arm.
Page 99 - I had little hope on Monday last but to have supped in your cabin ; but it pleased God to order it otherwise. I am thankful for it. As for those cowardly captains who deserted you, hang them up, for, by God, they deserve it. ."Yours,
Page 447 - ... was Captain Berry, late my first Lieutenant (Captain Miller was in the very act of going also, but I directed him to remain); he was supported from our sprit-sail yard, which hooked in the mizen rigging.
Page 133 - We have taken and destroyed all the Spanish ships and vessels which were upon the coast ; the number as per margin. I am, &c.

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