Caddie Woodlawn

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Aladdin Books, 1990 - Juvenile Fiction - 275 pages
5 Reviews
Chronicles the adventures of eleven-year-old Caddie growing up with her six brothers and sisters on the Wisconsin frontier in the mid-nineteenth century.

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These adventures of a young girl in the Wisconsin ‘wilderness’ make for a great read. It is hard today to imagine Wisconsin being considered ‘the west’ let alone ‘wilderness’. The strength of spirit it must have required to make a home and raise a family in the wilderness is unimaginable. This ‘American’ spirit is embodied in our young heroine, Caddie Woodlawn, as she matures from a tomboy to a young woman; without losing her self-reliant and independent streak. As father of three daughters, I appreciated the ‘talk’ that Caddie’s father gave her near the end of the book:
"It’s a strange thing, but somehow we expect more of girls than of boys. It is the sisters and wives and mothers, you know, Caddie, who keep the world sweet and beautiful. What a rough world it would be if there were only men and boys in it, doing things in their rough way! A woman’s task is to teach them gentleness and courtesy and love and kindness. It’s a big task, too, Caddie—harder than cutting trees or building mills or damming rivers. It takes nerve and courage and patience, but good women have those things. The have them just as much as the men who build bridges and carve roads through the wilderness. A woman’s work is something fine and noble to grow up to, and it is just as important as a man’s. But no man could ever do it so well."
Don’t imagine that this book is only for girls! The stories and adventures will appeal to both boys and girls. I highly recommend this book to young readers, especially those who enjoy the Little House on the Prairie stories or the feisty Anne of Green Gables.

Review: Caddie Woodlawn, Softcover

User Review  - Kathy Nadeau -

I'm using this book with my 4th graders as we study the pioneers of North America. The story is still interesting today. The students are enjoying the story. Read full review


Three Adventurers
The Circuit Rider
Pigeons in the Sky

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About the author (1990)

Carol Ryrie Brink was the author of many books for young readers, including "Caddie Woodlawn's Family, " the companion volume to "Caddie Woodlawn", and "Baby Island".

Trina Schart Hyman was born on April 8, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She studied at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, the Boston Museum School of Art, and Konstfackskolan, the Swedish State Art School. While living in Sweden, she got her first illustration job with Brown and Little. Her first work, Toffe and the Little Car, was published in 1961. During her lifetime, she illustrate over 150 children's books. She received numerous awards including a Horn Award for King Stork in 1973, the Caldecott Medal for Margaret Hodges's St. George and the Dragon: A Golden Legend Adapted from Edmund Spenser's 'Faerie Queen', and Caldecott honors three times for Little Red Riding Hood, A Child's Calendar, and Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins. She also wrote and illustrated her own books including How Six Found Christmas, A Little Alphabet, Little Red Riding Hood, and Self-Portrait: Trina Schart Hyman. She joined the staff of Cricket magazine for children as an artist and illustrator in 1972 and became its art director before leaving in 1979. She died from complications of breast cancer on November 19, 2004 at the age of 65.

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