Nineteen Months a Prisoner of War

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American News Company, 1865 - Columbia (S.C.) Asylum prison - 207 pages
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Page 172 - It would be in vain for me to attempt to describe the beautiful creature who then appeared before my eyes. More jewels hung about her lovely neck, and were suspended from her ears, or scattered over her tresses, than she had hairs on her head. Her...
Page 34 - After the experience of the 6rst he refused to go to hospital. He went to surgeon's call, but that did him no good. One night we laid down in our hut. About midnight he said he was cold. I gave him all the blanket I could. The next morning I looked at him, and found he was stark dead." Here the soldier thought for a moment, and then looked me full in the face, and with a wild grin said, in a voice as hollow as the sepulchre itself: " And I expect they'll have the trouble of carrying me out in a blanket...
Page 31 - Hard up, hard up! I never shall forget the day when I was hard up ; but I'll be well off yet, I'll be well off yet !" The manner of the man's expression soon told the whole story. His mental faculties were gone. The intensity of his suffering was more than he could endure. He was a maniac in the camp, strolling about chanting his mournful refrains, "Hard up, hard up! I never shall forget the day when I was hard up ; but I'll be well off yet.
Page 33 - you are very ill, why don't you get a permit for the hospital ?" He looked up surprised at my question, and merely asked, " Have you ever been there ?" "No," I replied. " Well, then don't ask such a question.
Page 33 - But pray is the hospital any more than what you suffer here ?" I inquired. " Ten or a hundred times : just as much more aa it takes to quickly put an end to a man," he said, gloomily. He seemed for a moment in deep meditation, and then continued : " I had two brothers, both older and stronger than myself; we belonged to the same company and the same regiment, and were captured in the same battle.
Page 46 - ... exciting the men and firing their blood. In these struggles the strongest invariably found the warmest part of the mass, and the weakest, lying on the outside shivering with the wind, would keep his place for a moment and jump up and strike for himself. This would bring the cold on the next. He too would jump up, and so on until the whole mass would be broken up and the men seeking other means of comfort.
Page 46 - I joined the throng, clasping my hands rapidly around my shoulders and jumping occasionally to start the circulation in my feet. While undergoing this process of warming, occasionally dashing across an open space in the camp, I saw numbers of men move from tent to tent begging and crying piteously, their jaws rattling with cold, to be admitted. As far as there was any possibility of accommodating another they were admitted, and the huts and tents were crammed to double their capacity.
Page 2 - McELKATH, in the Clerk's Office of the Diitrict Court of the United States, in and for the Southern District of New York. BY HKIIUKC !, * SAVAGE, U'ClunMl (me. NT PUBLISHERS
Page 46 - In these efforts the recklessness of the men was really painful. They would fall upon one another and struggle to be beneath. Here a desperate fight ensued, having at least the good effect of exciting the men and firing their blood. In these struggles the strongest invariably found the warmest part of...
Page 166 - ... of holding about two hundred, was packed full, with almost double that number. Those outside sat on the ground, without wood, shivering with cold, and no prospect of speedily being better off. The yard in which we were confined contained about five acres, and was surrounded on three sides by a brick wall ten feet in height, while on the fourth was a board fence, the same height. There were two buildings, in addition to the one mentioned, used as hospitals. Sinka and water were convenient. The...

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