Letters on Iceland: containing observations on the civil, literary, ecclesiastical, and natural history; antiquities, volcanos, basaltes, hot springs, customs, dress, manners of the inhabitants, &c. &c., made, during a voyage undertaken in the year 1772, by Joseph Banks, assisted by Dr. Solander, Dr. J. Lind, Dr. Uno von Troil, and several other literary and ingenious gentlemen

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Printed by and for W. Richardson, 1780 - History - 400 pages
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Page 289 - ... from without, and the air within being agitated by the flux and reflux of the tides, is perfectly dry and wholesome...
Page 291 - ... upon which we walked were often flat, having neither concavity nor convexity : the larger number however were concave, though...
Page 291 - Though they were broken and cracked through and through in all directions, yet their perpendicular figures might easily be traced: from whence it is easy to infer, that whatever the accident might have been, that caused the dislocation, it happened after the formation of the pillars.
Page 288 - Englifh gentleman, Mr. Leach *, who no fooner faw us than he told us, that about nine leagues from us was an...
Page 289 - Causeway, every stone being regularly formed into a certain number of sides and angles, till in a short time we arrived at the mouth of a cave, the most magnificent, I suppose, that has ever been described by travellers.
Page 289 - The impatience which every body felt to fee the wonders we • had heard fo largely defcribed, prevented our morning's reft ; every one was up and in motion before the break of day, and with the firft light arrived at the SW part of the ifland, the feat of the moft remarkable pillars ; where we no fooner arrived than we were ftruck...
Page 6 - We however pafled our time very agreeably, from one o'clock in, the night till two next day, in vifiting the mountain. We were even fo happy, that the clouds which covered the greatelt part of it dilperfed towards evening, and procured us the moft extenfive profpeet imaginable.
Page 290 - The first division of the island, for at high water it is ' divided into two, makes a kind of a cone, the pillars converging together towards the centre ; on the other, they are in general laid down flat, and in the front next to the main, you...
Page 289 - Handing in natural colonnades, according as the bays or points of land formed themfelves : upon a firm bafis of folid unformed rock, above thefe, the ftratum which reaches to the foil or furface of the ifland, varied in thicknefs, as the ifland itfelf formed into hills or...
Page 291 - ... as have been broken off, which extends as far under water as the eye can reach. Here the forms of the pillars are apparent. These are of three, four, five...

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