Children of Prometheus: The Accelerating Pace of Human Evolution

Front Cover
Basic Books, 1999 - Science - 310 pages
4 Reviews
Are we still evolving? Scientists have grappled with this question since the time of Darwin. Now, in this provocative book, biologist Christopher Wills argues that we are not only continuing to evolve but that our pace of change is accelerating. He examines the rapid, short-term evolutionary change taking place in people living at the earth’s extremes (even as babies, Tibetans can draw in more oxygen than lowlanders), and the new physiology of those who participate in extreme sports. But the more we shape our environment, the more it seems to shape us: Whether the future has us wiring our brains into vast electronic databases, or popping “smart drugs” that alter the brain’s very biochemical structure, new environmental pressures are speeding up our evolution in ways that we cannot now predict but that will help us to survive the future.
  

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Review: Children Of Prometheus: The Accelerating Pace Of Human Evolution

User Review  - Daniel - Goodreads

Lots of claims, flimsy supporting evidence. I didn't enjoy the writing style. Read full review

Review: Children Of Prometheus: The Accelerating Pace Of Human Evolution

User Review  - Goodreads

Lots of claims, flimsy supporting evidence. I didn't enjoy the writing style. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Authorities Disagree
17
Natural Selection Can Be Subtle
37
Living at the Edge of Space
55
Besieged by Invisible Armies
74
Perils of the Civil Service
103
The Road We Did Not Take
127
Why Are We Such Evolutionary Speed Demons?
151
Bottlenecks and Selective Sweeps
174
Sticking Out Like Cyrano s Nose
195
Going to Extremes
211
The Final Objection
250
Notes
272
Glossary
297
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Christopher Wills is Professor of Biology at the University of California at San Diego. His books include Yellow Fever, Black Goddess and Children of Prometheus. Jeffrey Bada is Professor of Marine Chemistry and Director of the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Exobiology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.

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