Geopolitics and the Anglophone Novel, 1890-2011

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 5, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 246 pages
Literary fiction is a powerful cultural tool for criticizing governments and for imagining how better governance and better states would work. Combining political theory with strong readings of a vast range of novels, John Marx shows that fiction over the long twentieth century has often envisioned good government not in Utopian but in pragmatic terms. Early-twentieth-century novels by Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster and Rabindrananth Tagore helped forecast world government after European imperialism. Twenty-first-century novelists such as Monica Ali, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Michael Ondaatje and Amitav Ghosh have inherited that legacy and continue to criticize existing policies in order to formulate best practices on a global scale. Marx shows how literature can make an important contribution to political and social sciences by creating a space to imagine and experiment with social organization.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 Fiction after liberalism
19
Chapter 2 How literature administers failed states
47
Chapter 3 The novelistic management of inequality in the age of meritocracy
89
Chapter 4 Entrepreneurship and imperial politics in twentiethcentury historical fiction
125
Chapter 5 Women as economic actors in contemporary and modernist novels
170
Postscript
213
Bibliography
219
Index
243
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About the author (2012)

John Marx is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Davis.

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