Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said: A Novel

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Mar 8, 2005 - Fiction - 240 pages
33 Reviews
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>On October 11 the television star Jason Taverner is so famous that 30 million viewers eagerly watch his prime-time show. On October 12 Jason Taverner is not a has-been but a never-was -- a man who has lost not only his audience but all proof of his existence. And in the claustrophobic betrayal state of Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, loss of proof is synonyms with loss of life.

Taverner races to solve the riddle of his disappearance", immerses us in a horribly plausible Philip K. Dick United States in which everyone -- from a waiflike forger of identity cards to a surgically altered pleasure -- informs on everyone else, a world in which omniscient police have something to hide. His bleakly beautiful novel bores into the deepest bedrock self and plants a stick of dynamite at its center.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pgiunta - LibraryThing

Following an attack by a jilted lover, renowned TV variety show host and singer, Jason Taverner, awakens in a cheap motel and soon discovers that he is unknown to the world. Neither his current ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - questbird - LibraryThing

Jason Taverner has everything and then he wakes up in a hotel room and nobody has ever heard of him. This is a science fiction about identity and mid-life crisis, Taverner seeks out various females to ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Phillip Kindred Dick is an American science fiction writer best known for his psychological portrayals of characters trapped in illusory environments. Born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1928, Dick worked in radio and studied briefly at the University of California at Berkeley before embarking on his writing career. His first novel, Solar Lottery, was published in 1955. In 1962, Dick won the Hugo Award for his novel, The Man in the High Castle. He also wrote a series of futuristic tales about artificial creatures on the loose; notable of these was Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which was later adapted into film as Blade Runner. Dick also published several collections of short stories. He died in Santa Ana, California, in 1982.

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