Borderland: Origins of the American Suburb, 1820-1939

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Yale University Press, Jul 1, 1990 - Social Science - 353 pages
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This fascinating 'prehistory' of the American suburb traces its evolution from the mid-1800s to the onset of World War II. Using a rich array of contemporary written and pictorial sources, prize-winning historian John R. Stilgoe guides us through the early suburbs of Manhattan, Boston, Chicago, and other cities, showing us not only how they looked but what life was like for the men and women who lived there.
 

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Borderland: origins of the American suburb, 1820-1939

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Stilgoe deals with one American ideal, that of living in a carefully arranged natural setting, in the appearance of simple country lifean ideal that only the rich can afford. Winding roads, lots of ... Read full review

Contents

Intellectual
4
WITCH HAZEL
23
SHADOWS
38
PARKS
49
HEIGHTS
56
PROSPERITY
68
VILLAGE
78
COUNTRY SEAT
93
The Planned
221
SHAKER HEIGHTS
239
IMPORT
252
COAST
271
Arrivals
279
LANDFALL
301
PHILADELPHIA 129
309
Copyright

GROUNDS
107

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About the author (1990)

John R. Stilgoe is Orchard Professor of Landscape History at Harvard University. He is the author of "Alongshore"; "Metropolitan Corridor: Railroads and the American Scene"; "Borderland: Origins of the American Suburb"; and "Common Landscape of America, 1540 to 1845," He lives in Norwell, Massachusetts.

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