Justices, presidents, and senators: a history of the U.S. Supreme Court appointments from Washington to Clinton

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999 - History - 429 pages
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Justices, Presidents, and Senators is the most comprehensive and accessible history of the first 108 members of the U.S. Supreme Court ever written. Henry J. Abraham, one of the nation's preeminent scholars of the judicial branch, addresses the vital questions of why individual justices were nominated to the highest court, how their nominations were received by legislators of the day, whether the appointees ultimately lived up to the expectations of the American public, and what legacy their jurisprudence left on the development of American law and society. Abraham's insights into the history of the Supreme Court are unrivaled by other studies of the subject; among his numerous observations is that fully one-fifth of the Court's members were viewed as failures by the presidents who appointed them. Enhanced by photographs of every justice--from Chief Justice John Jay in 1789 to the latest appointment, Justice Stephen G. Breyer in 1994--Abraham's eloquent writing and meticulous research guarantee that this book will interest both general readers and scholars. Book jacket.

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Contents

The Nixon
9
Why They Get There
35
The First Forty Years
53
The Next Forty Years
71
The Balance of the Nineteenth Century
95
Into the Twentieth Century
117
The Court Alters Course
157
The Warren Court
189
The Rehnquist Court
291
Epilogue
327
Rating Supreme Court Justices
369
Statistical Data on Supreme Court Justices
377
Bibliography
383
Photo Acknowledgments
411
Index of Names
419
About the Author
429

The Burger Court
251
Copyright

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