Report of the Committee of Ten on Secondary School Studies: With the Reports of the Conferences Arranged by the Committee

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National Educational Association, 1894 - Education - 249 pages
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This is an amazing report.The chairman of the committee, Harvard President Charles Eliot, had spent two years exploring European education. He didn't just study schools and institutions, but the interaction of education in all activities in society from the lowest to the highest.
The report is anything but stuffily intellectual. It goes into extraordinary practical detail, e.g. hours and time frame of instruction, the proper role of memorization and its abuse in the form of rote learning and glib recitations, the need for school libraries (then very limited); flexibility of class work, recognition of individual characteristics of students, teacher training, adaptation of schools to local conditions, college entrance examinations. Separate conferences reviewed each major core area, e.g. history, civil government, and political economy; biology (zoology and botany); geography (physiography, geology, etc.); history, civic government and political economy. it also deals with gradual development of skills from early grades, coverage of hygiene as a part of physiology (biology), and water supply basics.
If I could run my own or my childrens' education over again I would like it at a school guided by the principles of this 1894 report!
 

Contents

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Page 173 - ... 7. Should the subject be treated differently for pupils who are going to college, for those who are going to a scientific school, and for those who, presumably, are going to neither? "8. At what stage should this differentiation begin, if any be recommended?
Page 51 - ... who show themselves able to profit by an education prolonged to the eighteenth year, and whose parents are able to support them while they remain so long at school.
Page 113 - the square on the sum of two lines is equal to the sum of the squares on those lines plus twice their rectangle...
Page 3 - ... of secondary schools in the United States and into the requirements for admission to college — as, for example, of Latin, of geometry, or of American history — each conference to consider the proper limits of its subject, the best methods of instruction, the most desirable allotment of time for the subject, and the best methods of testing the pupils' attainments therein, and each^ conference to represent fairly the different parts of the country.
Page 170 - To sum up, one object of historical study is the acquirement of useful facts; but the chief object is the training of the judgment, in selecting the grounds of an opinion, in accumulating materials for an opinion, in putting things together, in generalizing upon facts, in estimating character, in applying the lessons of history to current events, 'and in accustoming children to state their conclusions in their own words.
Page 17 - ... every subject which is taught at all in a secondary school should be taught in the same way and to the same extent to every pupil so long as he pursues it, no matter what the probable destination of the pupil may be, or at what point his education is to cease.
Page 51 - Only an insignificant percentage of the graduates of these schools go to colleges or scientific schools. Their main function is to prepare for the duties of life that small proportion of all the children in the country — a proportion small in number, but very important to the welfare of the nation — who show themselves able to profit by an education prolonged to the eighteenth year, and whose parents are able to support them while they remain so long at school. There are, to be sure, a few private...
Page 41 - The adoption of the number four as the standard number of weekly periods will not make it impossible to carry into effect the fundamental conception of all the Conferences, namely, — . that all the subjects which make part of the secondary school course should be taught consecutively enough and extensively enough to make every subject yield that training which it is best fitted to yield, — provided that the proposed correlation and association of subjects are carried out in practice.
Page 140 - What topics, or parts, of the subject may reasonably be covered during the whole course? 5. What topics, or parts, of the subject may best be reserved for the last four years? 6. In what form and to what extent should the subject enter into college requirements for admission? Such questions as...
Page 5 - November 10, 1892, to organize conferences on the following subjects : (1) Latin; (2) Greek; (3) English; (4) other modern languages ; (5) mathematics ; (6) physics, astronomy, and chemistry; (7) natural history...

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