Physics and Cosmology: Scientific Perspectives on the Problem of Natural Evil

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Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2007 - Religion - 367 pages
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The essays in Physics and Cosmology: Scientific Perspectives on the Problem of Natural Evil resulted from the seventh international research conference co-sponsored by the Vatican Observatory Foundation and the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences. It is the first in a new series on the problem of natural evil--on reconciling suffering caused by natural processes with God's goodness. The editors have divided this volume into four sections. The first includes history of the issue and a critical analysis of how the history has often been understood, followed by two chapters that provide typologies: one of types of suffering, the other of the various "shapes" of defenses. The second section comprises chapters that address the problem of suffering head-on, with resources from science, theology, and philosophy. The third section contains essays that address the issue by offering reformulations of typical understandings of the relation between God and the world. Finally, essays in the fourth section claim, in one way or another, that the question of the volume needs to be reframed.Contributors: Niels Christian Hvidt, Terrence W. Tilley, Wesley J. Wildman, Christopher Southgate, Andrew Robinson, William R. Stoeger, S.J., Robert John Russell, Nancey Murphy, Thomas F. Tracy, Philip Clayton, Steven Knapp, Kirk Wegter-McNelly, Denis Edwards, Brad J. Kallenberg, and Don Howard.

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About the author (2007)

Nancey Murphy is professor of Christian philosophy at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.

Robert John Russell is founder and director of the Center for Theology and Natural Sciences, Berkeley, California. William R. Stoeger, S.J., is a staff astrophysicist with the Vatican Observatory Research Group at Castel Gandolfo, Italy, and adjunct associate professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona.