The Papers of James Madison, Purchased by Order of Congress; Being His Correspondence and Reports of Debates During the Congress of the Confederation and His Reports of Debates in the Federal Convention; Now Published from the Original Manuscripts, Volume 1

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J. & H. G. Langley, 1841 - Constitutional history
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Contents

gress on the preliminary articles To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia April
22
ordered for electingNominations since made To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia June
24
general indignation To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia June
25
der in cypher To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia July
30
LETTERS OF MR MADISON PRECEDING
43
To Edmund Pendleton Philadelphia Septem
50
suggested To Edmund Pendleton Philadelphia October 31 1780
58
To Joseph Jones Philadelphia November
60
THURSDAY December 12th 230 Report by the Committee touching the publication in the Boston
63
To Joseph Jones Philadelphia December
69
opulent Merchants of Philadelphia To EDMUND PENDLETON Philadelphia Septem
78
Unfavorable news from Europe To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia May 1 1781 90 Case of a vessel captured within North CarolinaAttempts
91
To Edmund Pendleton Philadelphia October
98
taining letters from Mr Deane believed to be spurious To Edmund Pendleton Philadelphia January 8 1782
104
the public debt before Congress To EDMUND PENDLETON Philadelphia Febru
113
To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia April 9 1782 118 Evidence from ancient records respecting the territorial claims
119
To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia April
121
To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia May
125
In cypher to which the key has not been discovered To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia August 9 1782
157
officeLoss of a French 74 in Boston harbourPrivate matters To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia Septem
166
ware bayLoss of one of them To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia Septem
173
To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia October
180
MONDAY November 4th
187
FRIDAY November 8th
194
WEDNESDAY November 20th 199 The Report on memorials from the Legislature of Pennsylvania
200
MONDAY November 25th
206
TUESDAY November5 26th 907
213
Thursday January 30th
313
WEDNESDAY February 5th
323
Wednesday March 19th 388 Letter from the Superintendent of FinanceDr FranklinCount
327
MONDAY February IOth 328 Report on Virginia resolutions relative to tobacco exported
331
FRIDAY February 14th 337 Mr Jeffersons mission suspended
337
WEDNESDAY February 19th 342 Impost and debate thereon
347
FRIDAY February 21st 351 Revival of the discussion on general revenue
358
WEDNESDAY February 26th 360 Refugees in the State of DelawareContinued debate on the val
363
MONDAY March 3d 369 Specific duties reported
370
MONDAY March 10th
377
MONDAY March 17th
384
Thursday March 20th
402
Cause of the grievances of the soldiery To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia June 30 1783 551 Measures to suppress the mutinyMembers summo...
408
Thursday March 27th
416
Friday March 28th 423 Proportion of slaves to freemenVoteArguments for various rates
425
MONDAY April 7th
432
FRIDAY April llth 438 Proclamation of the Secretary of Foreign Affairs discussed
438
WEDNESDAY April 16th
444
Monday April 21st 447
447
Tuesday May 20th 452 Debate on the proposal to discharge the troopsLaid on the table
454
WEDNESDAY June 4th 457 Army certificates for landSecretary of Foreign Affairs
458
Saturday June 21st
465
To EDMUND RANDOLPH Philadelphia January 7 1783 497 Grievances of the Army laid before CongressResolution of Vir
499
To Thomas Jefferson Philadelphia Febru
503
ness by the British Court To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia Febru
509
Legislature To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia July 28 1783 557 Philadelphia address to CongressPermanent residence of Con
559
To Edmund Randolph Philadelphia August
566

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Page 21 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise ; the State remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 376 - All charges of war and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury, which shall be supplied by the several states in proportion to the value of all land within each state...
Page 24 - ... might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us. and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people on whom he also obtruded them : thus paying off' former crimes committed against the LIBERTIES of one people with crimes which he urges them to commit against the LIVES of another...
Page xiv - To appoint one of their number to preside; provided, that no person be allowed to serve in the office of President more than one year in any term of three years : To ascertain the necessary sums of money to be raised for...
Page 22 - For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies...
Page 25 - Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our British Brethren We have warned them...
Page 23 - He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.
Page 24 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither. This piratical warfare, the opprobrium of INFIDEL powers, is the warfare of the CHRISTIAN king of Great Britain. Determined to keep open a market where MEN should be bought and sold, he has prostituted his negative...
Page 21 - He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly and continually for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time after such dissolutions to cause others to be elected, whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise, the State remaining, in the...
Page 20 - Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies ; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to [expunge] their former systems of government.

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