The History of Kentucky: Exhibiting an Account of the Modern Discovery; Settlement; Progressive Improvement; Civil and Military Transactions; and the Present State of the Country ...

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G.S. Robinson, printer, 1824 - Kentucky - 47 pages
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Page 311 - In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the official conduct of officers, or men in a public capacity, or where the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence; and, in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have a right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.
Page 256 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Page 299 - Senate, appoint all officers, whose offices are established by this Constitution, or shall be established by law, and whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for...
Page 24 - I do solemnly swear that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich...
Page 310 - That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are founded on their authority and instituted for their peace, safety, and happiness.
Page 255 - That the several states composing the United States of America, are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their general government...
Page 270 - ... any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings, against the government of the United States, or either house of the congress of the United States...
Page 305 - All impeachments shall be tried by the Senate; when sitting for that purpose the Senators shall be upon oath or affirmation, to do justice according to law and evidence: no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.
Page 296 - Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and publish them weekly, except such parts as may require secrecy. And the yeas and nays of the members on any question shall, at the desire of any two of them, be entered on the journals.
Page 310 - For the advancement of these ends they have at all times an inalienable and indefeasible right to alter, reform or abolish their government in such manner as they may think proper.

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