Modern Arabic Literature

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Cambridge University Press, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 571 pages
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This volume of the Cambridge History of Arabic Literature provides the first authoritative, comprehensive, critical survey of creative writing in Arabic from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. The rise of secular education, printing and journalism created a new reading public, and Western ideas and literary forms, notably the novel, the short story, and drama, became influential. This book examines the attempts made by Arab men and women to adapt the imported forms as well as the indigenous literary tradition to meet the requirements of the modern world. Quoted material is given in English translation and there is an extensive bibliography.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Neoclassical Arabic poets
36
The Romantic poets
82
Modernist poetry in Arabic
132
The beginnings of the Arabic novel
180
The mature Arabic novel outside Egypt
193
The Egyptian novel from Zaynab to 1980
223
early developments
329
Arabic drama since the thirties
358
The prose stylists
404
The critics
417
Arab women writers
443
Poetry in the vernacular
463
51
566
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About the author (1992)

Badawi is a Fellow of St. Anthony's College in Oxford.