Media at War: Radio's Challenge to the Newspapers, 1924-1939

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1995 - History - 168 pages
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Fought when radio was first introduced, the Press-Radio war was an attempt on the part of print journalists to block the emergence of radio news. For nearly a decade, the newspapers of America fought to keep broadcast journalism off the air, exerting various forms of economic, regulatory, and legal pressure against new competitors. This study traces the stages and forms of institutional self-defense utilized by the press. Far more than mere battles to protect profits, media wars are fights to preserve the institutional power that derives from controlling the channels of communication.

 

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Contents

Media Wars and Resistance to New Technologies
1
The PressRadio War A Battle in Three Stages
11
Radios Threat to the Institutional Identity of the Press
41
Radios Threat to the Institutional Structure of the Press
79
Radios Threat to the Institutional Function of the Press
119
Epilogue
153
Bibliography
159
Index
165
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About the author (1995)

GWENYTH L. JACKAWAY is an Assistant Professor of Communications at Fordham University, New York, where she teaches courses in media history, mass culture, and research methods.

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