Mosul before Iraq: Like Bees Making Five-Sided Cells

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jun 22, 2000 - History - 278 pages
0 Reviews
Drawing upon original source documents, Mosul before Iraq paints a portrait of the region during the turbulent nineteenth century. What emerges is a picture of citizens less focused on Europe or Istanbul and more on centuries-old relationships among its economic and social spheres. By arguing that the region belongs to a broader geographic, economic, and political space which crosses current national borders, the book explains the continuing conflict over the status of Mosul.

Like bees building unconventional cells, Mosul's people innovated during the nineteenth century. They worked to incorporate new methods, new products, and new interactions into networks that they had already constructed in their crafts, their commerce, their city, and their region.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Mosul and Its Officials
21
The Ottomans and Mosul
24
Mosuls Government
28
Institutions of Government
34
Centralization
37
Struggles for Power
40
Taxation
41
NonMuslim Communities
43
Tolls Taxes and Monopolies
110
The Challenge of Counting
114
Foreign Trade Regional Trade
117
Conclusion
121
Peasants and the City
125
Planting and Harvesting
126
Taxes
132
Credit
137

Christians versus Christians
49
Challenge in the Mountains
51
Riots in the City
58
The Revolution of 1908
60
Conclusion
62
People of the City
67
Food and Water
71
Working Life
74
Textiles
76
Making Ends Meet
81
Foreign Trade Local Government and Conflict
83
Reform and Reaction
86
Conclusion
89
Merchants
93
Rafts and Donkeys
95
Mules
100
Camels
101
Steamships
104
Justice
105
Credit
107
Land Ownership
139
Enforcement and Effects of the Land Reform Laws
142
Labor and Increasing Exports
149
Food Scarcity and Power
151
Conclusion
156
Nomads
161
Interdependence
162
Nomads Sheep and Wool
169
Government and the Politics of the Nomads
176
Conclusion
181
Conclusions and Suggestions
185
Politics and Foreign Trade Historiography
188
The Mosul Question
189
Permeable Boundaries Impenetrable Borders
190
The Political Implications of Regional Trade
191
APPENDIX
193
NOTES
213
BIBLIOGRAPHY
255
INDEX
271
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Sarah D. Shields is Associate Professor in the History Department at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.