The speaker: or, Miscellaneous pieces selected from the best English writers. To which are prefixed two essays: i. On elocution. ii. On reading works of taste, by W. Enfield. Genuine ed., ed. with the addition of popular pieces from modern authors, by J. Pycroft

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William Enfield, James Pycroft
1851
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Contents

Ode to Evening Collins
260
Spring Mrs Barbauld
261
Domestic Love and Happi ness Thomson
263
The Pleasures of Retirement 76
265
Genius Akenside
267
Greatness 76
268
Novelty 76
270
Philanthropy Darwin
272
The Rose Cowper
273
The Poets New Years Gift lb
274
Catharins lb
275
Page Chap p 38 The Evening Walk Hurdis
277
The Garden of Eden Milton
281
The Spanish Armada T B Macaulay
286
PATHETIC PIECES 1 The Story of Le Fevre Sterne
287
Yoricks Death lb
295
The Beggars Petition
297
Elegy on the Death of an Un fortunate Lady Pope
298
Satans Soliloquy Milton
300
Catos Soliloquy Addison
303
Southampton and Essex
304
Earl of Essex
305
Orlando and Adam Shak speare
308
Scroop and Richard lb
310
Henry IV s Soliloquy on Sleep lb
312
Henry IV and Prince Henry lb
313
Henry VI Warwick and Cardinal Beaufort lb
316
Wolsey and Cromwell lb
317
Lear Jo
320
Macbeths Soliloquy lb
321
Macduff Malcolm and Rosse lb
322
Antonys Soliloquy over Cae sars Body lb
324
Antonys Oration over Ca sars Body 76
325
The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius Shakspeare
327
Othello and Iago lb
331
Hamlets Soliloquy on his Mothers Marriage lb
335
Hamlet and Ghost 76
336
Hamlets Soliloquy on Death lb
339
Soliloquy of the King in Hamlet lb
340
Ode on St Cecilias Day Pope
341
Alexanders Feast Eryden
344
Ou the Death of Mrs Throck mortons Bullfinch Cowper
348
Vanity of Human Wishes Johnson
350
Alexander Selkirk Coicper
354
Burial of Sir John Moore Rev J Wolfe
355
Destruction of Sennacherib Byron
356
My Country Scott
357
Hymn written in IniiaEeber
358
On Solitude Byron
360
Melrose Abbey Scott
361
The Homes of England Felicia JJemans
363

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Page 79 - ... accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men, and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Page 352 - By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast, Nor in sheet nor in shroud we wound him ; But he lay like a warrior taking his rest, With his martial cloak around him.
Page 77 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Page 153 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer; not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all freemen?
Page 317 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand ? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight ? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain ? I see thee yet, in form as palpable As this which now I draw. Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going ; And such an instrument I was to use. Mine eyes are made the fools o...
Page 351 - NOT a drum was heard, not a funeral note, As his corse to the rampart we hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot O'er the grave where our hero we buried. We buried him darkly at dead of night, The sods with our bayonets turning; By the struggling moonbeam's misty light, And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast...
Page 352 - THE Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold, And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold; And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea. When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee.
Page 248 - His youthful hose well sav'd, a world too wide For his shrunk shank ; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.
Page 325 - You have done that you should be sorry for. There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats; For I am arm'd so strong in honesty, That they pass by me as the idle wind Which I respect not.
Page 192 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.

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