The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies

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Oxford University Press, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 1021 pages
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The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies presents discussions by leading experts on all significant aspects of this diverse and fast-growing field. The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies deals with the history and culture of the Byzantine Empire, the eastern half of the Late Roman Empire, from the fourth to the fourteenth century. Its centre was the city formerly known as Byzantium, refounded as Constantinople in 324 CE, the present-day Istanbul. Under its emperors, patriarchs, and all-pervasive bureaucracy Byzantium developed a distinctive society: Greek in language, Roman in legal system, and Christian in religion. Byzantium's impact in the European Middle Ages is hard to over-estimate, as a bulwark against invaders, as a meeting-point for trade from Asia and the Mediterranean, as a guardian of the classical literary and artistic heritage, and as a creator of its own magnificent artistic style.
  

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Contents

Byzantine Studies as an academic discipline
3
Instrumenta Tools for the study of discipline
21
2 Chronology and dating
31
3 Late Roman and Byzantine weights and weighing equipment
38
4 Archaeology
47
5 Critical approaches to art history
59
6Iconography
67
7 Literary criticism
77
2 Bureaucracy and aristocracies
518
3 Clergy monks and laity
527
The State
539
2 The army
554
3 Revenues and expenditure
562
The Church
571
2 The episcopal councils in the East
583
3 The two churches
592

8 Textual criticism
86
9 Lexicography and electronic textual resources
95
10 Greek palaeography
101
11 Papyrology
115
12 Documents
129
B Athos
136
CVenetian Crete
141
13 Epigraphy
144
14 Sigillography
150
15 Numismatics
157
16 Prosopography
176
17 Dendrochronology
182
18 Brickstamps
193
19 Topography of Constantinople
202
THE PHYSICAL WORLD LANDSCAPE LAND USE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
217
The political geography of the Byzantine world
219
2 Politicalhistorical survey
232
B 518800
249
C 8001204
264
D 12041453
280
Communications Roads and bridges
295
population demography and disease
309
Settlement
317
2 The Village
328
Buildings and their decorations
335
2 Churches and monasteries
353
3 Secular and military buildings
373
4 Wallpaintings and mosaics
385
Production manufacture and technology
397
2 Fabrics and clothing
407
3 Silk production
421
4 Ceramics
429
5 Metalwork
444
6 Ivory steatite enamel and glass
453
7 Book production
462
8 Military technology and warfare
473
9 Shipping and seafaring
482
10 Everyday technologies
492
INSTITUTIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS
503
Hierarchies
505
4 Liturgy
599
5 Monasticism and monasteries
611
6 Charitable institutions
621
The Economy
631
Society
643
2 Families and kinship
652
3 Patronage and retinues
661
4 Food wine and feasting
669
5 Entertainments theatre and hippodrome
677
6 Health hygiene and healing
685
Justice Legal literature
691
The Spiritual World
699
2 philosophies
711
The Symbolic World
721
2 Art and liturgy
731
3 Art and pilgrimage
741
4 Art and iconoclasm
750
5 Icons
758
6 Art and the periphery
770
Language education and literacy
777
2 Education
785
3 Literacy
796
4 Numeracy and science
803
5 Libraries
820
Literature
827
2 Historiography
838
3 Theological literature
853
4 Hagiography
862
5 Homolies
872
6 Epistolography
882
7 Poetry and romances
894
8 Military texts
907
Music
915
THE WORLD AROUND BYZANTIUM
937
Byzantium and its neighbors
939
Byzantiums role in world history
957
1 Rulers
962
2 Patriarchs and popes
972
Index
976
Copyright

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About the author (2008)


Elizabeth Jeffreys is Emeritus Bywater and Sotheby Professor of Byzantine and Modern Greek Language and Literature, Oxford University, and Emeritus Fellow of Exeter College.

John Haldon is Professor of Byzantine History, Princeton University.

Robin Cormack is Professor Emeritus, History of Art, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London and Honorary Professor in the History of Classical Art, University of Nottingham.

Bibliographic information