Manual of Classical Literature

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E.C. Biddle, 1855 - Art - 690 pages
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Contents

and Priestesses 23 Rites ablutions
24
Sacrifices the ceremonies 28 Gifts
31
lia Rhaetia Noricum Pannonia Illyri
32
Iliac Table 2226 Lyric poetry 27 134 Hephaestion 135 Apollonius Dys
33
Rome 51 52 Gates and roads 53
41
general division of Asia 151155 Coun
46
Pluto 3537 Apollo 3840 Diana
47
Palaestina 168b Topography of Jeru
53
Venus Cupid 5154 Vulcan 5556
55
Satyre 45 Different forms of Sa 145 Eustathius 146 Gregorius Pardus
56
of Africa 174176 Egypt 177
59
divisions of time day month and year
63
creased 65 a Temples more splendid
65
gods p 113124
68
Oaths Leagues 70 Oracles
72
Euripides 64 Empedocles 65 Aris 152 References on the writers of this
76
class 69 70 Coplus 71 72 Sol or
77
Adonis of Bacchus of Ceres of Minerva
78
PART IV
83
Nemesis 84 AEsculapius Ş85 Plutus
86
three classes I In scriptions 87 Custom of finishing study abroad Places
88
Uncoined metal first used 95 Ear tium Berytus Massilia Augustodunum
94
known in the heroic ages 83 Eloquence her priests and legislators Subjects of speculation in the early religious philoso
95
distinguished by peculiarities 92 Draco
98
Pygmies 99 Tritons 100 Sirens
104
Lysias 103 Isocrates 104 Isaeus in which the several sects arose Grecian
105
mans Two different theories respecting ancient Latin manuscripts known
110
The Forty The Diaetetae 112 Dif
114
Dreams and Death 114 Satyrs
117
flicting death 116 Public rewards
120
Nomophulakes and other magistrates
125
cules 125 126 Theseus Ş 127
127
Jason and the Argonauts 129 Castor
133
retained especially by the Spartans
136
GRECIAN ANTIQUities
141
The divisions of the army
142
cities 149 Treatment of captured places
150
rewards and punishments 152 Means
156
meaning of the term 155 156 Origin of the most remarkable ancient gems
161
The different meals Manner of II Civil Affairs p 248270
169
costume attitudes 164 Busts The early existence in Chaldaea and Egypt
176
Gold and silver 175 Greek system of Knights 257 The Senate 258 259
179
Sophists and Rhetoricians p 490496 Ş 182 Christian philosophy Peripatetic philosophy after time of Constantine
183
riod until time of Constantine 239
245
lostratus 255 c Eunapius 256 Zo useful as helps 300 Plan followed
259
ligio 200 Origin of the religion of the Auxiliaries 293 Attendants upon
299
Altars 206 Wessels employed in sacri
303
ARCHAEOLOGY of LITERATURE AND
305
this part 198201 Methods of ascertain
308
Epulones 212 Feciales 213 Rex Rewards of generals 306 Laws on
313
Comedy 318 Atellane Fables
319
ARCHAEology of GREER LITERATURE
323
A1 mes 319 b Pantomime 320 Ori
326
Lyric 330 331 Bucolic 332
332
Of the most flourishing period
334
PART
335
Elegiac 334336 Didactic
337
General references Collections
348
Plautus 353 Pacuvius 354 Accius 6
359
Horace 364 Ovid 365 Cornelius
367
Intercourse of the Romans with the Preliminary Remarks p 379381
379
Gręcia 2 Countries included under
380
Statius 379 Martial 380 Juvenal
381
earliest ages 391 Influence of Greek
394
Cotta 397 The two great rivals Hor
404
First rhetoricians at Rome Opposition
415
04
435
of Roman epistles extant The earliest
441
philosophy 447 Numa a philosopher
448
perors Introduction of oriental views
454
Cynic 400 Epicurean 461 Skeptic
462
Eclectics 466 Philosophy of Christian
468
OEconomists p 614622
475
Knowledge of geography among
481
Class of writers termed OEconomists
488
Porcius Cato 499 Varro 500 a Colu Serenus Sammonicus
501
The Pontifical Commentaries
508
cipal writers in the third period of Roman
523
Cornelius Nepos 531 Titus Livius
532
Suetonius 538 Justin 539 Sextus
541
a Catos book of medicine A 547
547
sores or landsurveyors 489 General
619
Principal authors in physics 552
639
Christian Writings in the Latin Lan
647
Progress of classical learning in the United
681

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Page 313 - It would be ridiculous to affirm as a discovery, that the species of the horse was probably never the same with that of the lion ; yet, in opposition to what has dropped from the pens of eminent writers, we are obliged to observe, that men have always appeared among animals a distinct and...
Page 134 - Echidna; a monster having the head and breasts of a woman, the body of a dog, the tail of a serpent, the wings of a bird, the paws of a lion, with a human voice.
Page 357 - It was sent as a present to King Charles I. from Cyrillus Lucaris, a native of Crete, and patriarch of Constantinople, by Sir Thomas Rowe, ambassador from England to the Grand Seignior in the year 1628. Cyrillus brought it with him from Alexandria where it was probably written.
Page 433 - ... irregular style of building, which continued to be imitated, especially in Italy, during the dark ages. It consisted of Grecian and Roman details, combined under new forms, and piled up into structures wholly unlike the antique originals. Hence the names Greco-gothic and Romanesque architecture have been given to it.
Page 255 - Equites and the centuries of this class were called first to give their votes, and if they were unanimous, the matter was determined but if not, then the centuries of the next class were called, and so on, till a majority of centuries had voted the same thing. And it hardly ever happened that they came to the lowest, Liv. i. 43. Dionys. vii. 59.
Page 90 - ... by the lovely goddess Hebe. Here they conversed of the affairs of heaven and earth; and as they quaffed their nectar, Apollo, the god of music, delighted them with the tones of his lyre, to which the Muses sang in responsive strains. When the sun was set, the gods retired to sleep in their respective dwellings. The following lines from the Odyssey...
Page 166 - ... cunningly contrived as to have a small aperture, easily concealed, and level with the surface of the rock. This was barely large enough to admit the entrance of a single person; who having descended into the narrow passage, might creep along until he arrived immediately behind the centre of the altar; where, being hid by some colossal statue or other screen, the sound of his voice would produce a most imposing effect among the humble votaries prostrate beneath, who were listening in silence upon...
Page 492 - The scarcity and dearness of books gave high value to that learning, which a man with a well stored and a ready and clear elocution could communicate. None without eloquence could undertake to be instructors ; so that the sophists in giving lessons of eloquence were themselves the example. They frequented all places of public resort, the agora, the...
Page 228 - Roman citizens, who, with the proportion of women and children, must have amounted to about twenty millions of souls. The multitude of subjects of an inferior rank was uncertain and fluctuating. But, after weighing with attention every circumstance which could influence the balance, it seems probable that there existed, in the time of Claudius, about twice as many provincials as there were citizens, of either sex, and of every age; and that the slaves were at least A equal in number to the free inhabitants...
Page 305 - Its front is occupied by a bas-relief and inscription. — A. sort of solid bench for the reception of urns runs round the funeral chamber, and several niches for the same purpose are hollowed in the wall, called columbaria from their resemblance to the holes of a pigeon-house.

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