Building Red America: The New Conservative Coalition and the Drive for Permanent Power the Drive for Permanent Power

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Basic Books, Aug 28, 2007 - Political Science - 320 pages
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This powerful examination of the present and future of American politics, by one of America's most distinguished political journalists, reveals how the Republican Party has gained a long-term institutional advantage that allows it to shrug off apparent setbacks like the 2006 elections. Building Red America takes us deeper than any previous book into the operations of the power brokers and issues that galvanize voters.
 

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BUILDING RED AMERICA: The New Conservative Coalition and the Drive for Permanent Power

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A penetrating examination of the Republicans' permanent campaign—and the Democrats' still-formidable disadvantages—from Washington Post senior political reporter Edsall.Globalization and the civil ... Read full review

Building red America: the new conservative coalition and the drive for permanent power

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

These two books look at the recent consolidation of power by the Republican party. "I am not a member of an organized political party," said Will Rogers. "I am a Democrat." And that disorganization is ... Read full review

Contents

1 Democratic Party Weaknesses Have Magnified Republican Party Advantages 1
1
Polarization as a Republican Strategy 50
50
Christians to the Right Media to the Left 78
78
4 The Republican Party Weds Corporate America 106
106
5 The Two Revolutions 154
154
An Enormous Expansion in the Role of Market Forces 194
194
Two Sets of ProblemsIdeological and Structural 211
211
ThreeQuarters or Half a Party 248
248
Notes 255
255
Index 309
309
About the Author 321
321
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About the author (2007)

Thomas B. Edsall covered national politics for twenty-five years at the Washington Post. He is now a correspondent for the New Republic and the National Journal. He was a guest columnist in 2006 for the New York Times, and holds the Pulitzer-Moore Chair in Public Affairs Journalism at Columbia University in New York. His previous book, Chain Reaction: The Impact of Race, Rights, and Taxes, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction in 1992. He lives in New York and Washington, D.C.

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