The history of the Arabians, under the government of the caliphs, from Mahomet, their founder, to the death of Mostazem, the fifty-sixth and last Abassian caliph: containing the space of six hundred thirty-six years

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T. Payne, 1758 - History
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Page 41 - ... thee; lest a crime should be charged on the true believers in marrying the wives of their adopted sons' when they have determined the matter concerning them; and the command of God is to be performed. No crime is to be charged on the Prophet as to what God hath allowed him...
Page 39 - THE word Koran, derived from the verb karaa, to read, signifies properly in Arabic, the reading, or rather, that which ought to be read ; by which name the Mohammedans denote not only the entire book or volume of the Koran, but also any particular chapter or section of it...
Page 42 - O prophet, why boldest thou that to be prohibited which God hath allowed thee, seeking to please thy wives ; since God is inclined to forgive, and merciful ? God hath allowed you the dissolution of your oaths...
Page 151 - ... resolution of any man could enable him to sustain the difficulties which during this period he encountered. Once however even the resolution of Frederick was on the point of giving way. After the battle of Colin, when his affairs seemed altogether desperate, he wrote to his sister at Bareith that he was on the point of putting an end to his own life. And, as he wished to have it said that he made verses even on the brink of the grave, he wrote a long poetical epistle to the marquis d'Argens,...
Page 215 - From his fides proceed an agreeable odour of muflc and faffron. He hath a foul like the human foul. He hears and underftands what is faid to him, but can neither fpeak nor anfwer. The reins of his bridle are pearls ftrung with precious ftones and hyacinths. His chains are gold and filver. His bridle is of red hyacinth. His two wings are embroidered with light, and he makes ufe of them to fly like other birds.
Page 42 - As it would have been a very difficult matter for him to have kept this oath, he was foon releafed from it by the angel Gabriel, who came and reproached him in thefe terms.
Page 40 - But w when Zeid- had determined the matter concerning her, and had " refolved to divorce her, we joined her 'in marriage unto thee — < " No crime is to be charged on the prophet, as to what God hath
Page 215 - ... or like a flame of fire. His tail is overlaid with emeralds. It is long ; and waving it on each fide, therewith he ftrikes his fides and his fetlocks. He hath two wings like thofe of an eagle, and large as the circumference of a great pool, ftrewed with pearl, and enamelled like a meadow, and covered with precious ftones. From his fides proceed an agreeable odour of muflc and faffron.
Page 154 - Cohafa, being ready to depart from this world to the next, do " make my will, at that moment when infidels believe, when I " wicked no longer doubt, and when liars fpeak the truth.
Page 215 - Mahomet then relates the invitation he received from the angel Gabriel to go with him and fee God ; and that he might perform the journey more conveniently, he mounted him on a very extraordinary kind of beaft, whom tke angel led by the bridle. Mahomet thus defcribes the beaft. "Youmuft know...

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