The Gender of Constitutional Jurisprudence

Front Cover
Beverley Baines, Ruth Rubio-Marin, Professor of Constitutional and Public Comparative Law Ruth Rubio-Marin
Cambridge University Press, 2005 - Law - 342 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
To explain how constitutions shape and are shaped by women's lives, the contributors to this volume examine constitutional cases pertaining to women in twelve countries. Analyzing jurisprudence about reproductive, sexual, familial, socio-economic, and democratic rights, they focus constructively on women's claims to equality, asking who makes these claims, what constitutional rights inform them, how they have evolved, what arguments work in defending them, and how they relate to other national issues. Their findings reveal significant similarities in outcomes and in reasoning about women's constitutional rights in these twelve countries, challenging the tradition of distinguishing constitutional jurisprudence depending on whether the country has a written or unwritten constitution, subscribes to civil or common law, is a federal or unitary state, limits constitutional adjudication to the public domain, accords international norms binding or subject to incorporation force, or relies on a specialized or general court to adjudicate constitutional matters.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Embedded Constitutionalism
22
Using the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
48
Gender Jurisprudence under
75
Gender Equality and International Human Rights in Costa
99
The French Ways
122
Gender in the German Constitution
149
India Sex Equality and Constitutional Law
174
Constitutional Transformation Gender Equality
205
The Spanish Experience
256
Equal Protection
306
Index
333
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Beverly Baines is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada where she originated the Law Gender Equality and Feminist Jurisprudence courses. Her research interests include issues in constitutional law, feminist legal theory, anti-discrimination law, multiculturalism, and equality rights. She has contributed chapters to Conversation Among Friends - Entre Amies: Women and Constitutional Reform, Changing Patterns: Women in Canada, and Women and the Constitution, and has written articles for major Canadian and international journals.

Ruth Rubio-Marin is Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Seville, Spain. She is author of Immigration as a Democratic Challenge: Citizenship and Inclusion in Germany and the United States and of articles on language rights, nationality, immigration and gender in law. She has taught at several North American academic institutions including Princeton University and Columbia Law School and is currently a member of the Hauser Global Law School Program at New York University.

Ruth Rubio-Marin is Associate Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of Seville, Spain. She is author of Immigration as a Democratic Challenge: Citizenship and Inclusion in Germany and the United States and of articles on language rights, nationality, immigration and gender in law. She has taught at several North American academic institutions including Princeton University and Columbia Law School and is currently a member of the Hauser Global Law School Program at New York University.

Bibliographic information