A Practical Treatise on Hydraulic and Water-supply Engineering

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D. Van Nostrand, 1886 - Hydraulic engineering - 629 pages
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Contents

Art S Statistics of Water Supplied o Census Statistics 10 Approximate
44
CHAPTER IV
45
Mean Rainfall in different River Basins
51
Rainfall in the United States
53
Volumes of Rainfall per minute for given inches of Rain per twenty four hours
62
Flood Volumes from given Watershed Areas
67
Summary of Rainfall upon the Cochituate Basin
74
Summary of Rainfall upon the Croton WestBranch Basin
76
Summary of Volume of Flow from the Cochituate Basin
79
Monthly Ratios of Flow of Streams
76
Ratios of Mean Monthly Rain and Inches of Rain Flowing each Month
77
Equivalent Volumes of Flow for given Depths of Rain in One Month
82
ayi Statistics of Flow of Sudbury River Mass 830
84
23 Percentage of Rainfall Flowing from the Sudbury Basin
84
CHAPTER V
84
Table No Page 24 Evaporation from Water
89
Monthly Ratios of Evaporation from Reservoirs
92
Storage Art 59 Artificial Storage 60 Losses Incident to Storage 61
93
Monthly Supply to and Draft from a Reservoir with Compensation
96
Monthly Supply to and Draft from a Reservoir without Compensa tion
97
Art 74 Estimate of Available Annual Flow of Streams 75 Estimate
100
Ratios of Monthly Rain Flow Evaporation and Consumption
101
CHAPTER VIII
112
Percolation of Rain into One SquareMile of Porous Soil nr 32 Analyses of Various Lake Spring and Well Waters
117
Analyses of Various River and Brook Waters
118
Analyses of Various Streams in Massachusetts
120
Analyses of Various Water Supplies from Domestic Wells
121
Art 97 The Composition of Water 98 Solutions in Water 99 Properties
122
Artesian Well Temperatures
127
36a Analyses of Ice from a Stagnant Pond
136
CHAPTER IX
139
Analyses of Various Mineral Spring Waters
143
Art 148 Special Characteristics of Water 149 Atomic Theory 150 Molec
164
Weights and Volumes of Water at Different Temperatures
166
Pressures of Water at Stated Depths
172
Syphon 187 Pressure Convertible into Motion Motion of Water
188
Correspondent Heights Velocities and Times of Falling Bodies
190
CHAPTER XI
194
Coefficients from Michelottis Experiments with Orifices
198
Coefficients from Bossuts Experiments with Orifices
199
Coefficients from Lespinasses Experiments with Orifices
201
Coefficients from General Elliss Experiments with Orifices
203
Coefficients for Rectangular Orifices vertical
205
Coefficients for Rectangular Orifices horizontal
206
CHAPTER XII
213
Castels Experiments with Convergent Tubes
217
Venturis Experiments with Divergent Tubes
219
Eytelweins Experiments with Compound Tubes
220
Art 225 An Ajutage 226 Increase of Coefficient 227 Adjutage Vacuum
222
Compound Duplex PumpingEngine
223
Coefficients of Efflux c for Short Pipes
227
52a Experimental Coefficients of Flow by H Smith Jr
236
Experimental Coefficients of Flow by Darcy
237
Experimental Coefficients of Flow by Fanning
238
Experimental Coefficients of Flow m by Couplet
239
Experimental Coefficients of Flow by Darcy
240
6r Tabulated Series of Coefficients of Flow m
242
Art 244 Pipe and Conduit 245 Short Pipes give Greatest Discharge 246
246
Coefficients for Clean Slightly Tuberculated and Foul Pipes
248
Diagram of Frictional Head in Branch Pipes
250
Various Formulas for Flow of Water in Pipes
252
for given Slopes and Diameters
259
Tble No Page 65 Tables of h and K due to given Velocities
264
Values of c and c for Tubes
266
Diagram of Coefficient Values for Rouirh Pipes
269
66a Subcoefficients of Flow c in Pipes
271
Coefficients of Resistance in Bends
274
CHAPTER XIV
277
Experimental Weir Coefficients
288
Coefficients for given Depths upon Weirs
289
CHAPTER XV
326
Improved Current Meters 32a
331
Art 322 Gravity the Origin of Flow 323 Resistance to Flow 324 Equa
332
SECTION III
333
Weights of Embankment Materials
341
Angles of Repose and Frictions of Embankment Materials
345
Distributing Reservoir 333
353
Art 345 Ultimate Economy of Skillful Construction 346 Embankment Foun
360
CHAPTER XVII
370
Dimensions of Water Supply and Irrigation Canals
373
Compound Inverted PumpingEngine
376
WasteWeir Volumes for given Depths
380
Lengths and Discharges of WasteWeirs and Dams
381
Section of Austin Dam
386
Thicknesses of Masonry Weirs and Dams
387
Art 384 The Office and Influence of a WasteWeir 385 Discharges over
390
Coefficients of Masonry Frictions
396
Art 395 Design 396 Theory of WaterPressure upon a Vertical Surface
397
Computed Pressures in Masonry
403
Limiting Pressures upon Masonry
404
Dimension of Walls to Retain Water
406
Dimension of Walls to Sustain Earth
420
Thicknesses of a Curvedface Wall
422
424 Inclination of Foundation 425 Front Batters and Steps 426
426
MASONRY CONDUITS Pace
431
Cylindrical Penstocks
440
Hydraulic Mean Radii for Circular Conduits
442
90a Coefficients for Smooth Conduits
444
Conduit Data
445
CHAPTER XXI
446
Art 445 Static Pressures in Pipes 446 Thickness of Shell resisting Static
451
Thicknesses of Castiron Pipes
455
937 Thicknesses of Castiron Pipes as used in several Cities
456
Parts of an Inch and Foot expressed Decimally
457
Dimensions of Castiron Waterpipes 1
461
Flange Data of Flanged Cast iron Pipes
462
Various Formulas for Thicknesses of Castiron Pipes
465
Weights of Castiron Pipes
468
98c Weights of Castiron Pipes as used in several Cities
469
Branch Reducer and Bend
478
Thicknesses of Wrought iron Pipe Shells
486
Thicknesses and Weights of Iron Plates
488
CHAPTER XXII
493
lot Friclional Head in Pipes
495
Relative Discharging Capacities of Pipes
500
Depths to lay Water pipes in different Latitudes
502
Elementary Dimensions of Pipes
504
Flush Fire Hydrants
509
Table No lage
510
Experimental Volumes of Fire Hydrant Streams
520
Frictional Head in Service Pipes
528
CHAPTER XXIII
530
log Dimensions of Filterbeds for given Volumes
554
CHAPTER XXIV
557
no Piston Spaces for given Arcs of Crank Motion
562
Geared PumpingEngine Providence
573
Costs of Pumping in Various Cities
575
Special Trial Duties of Various Pumping Engines
581
H A F T E R XXV
585
Tank Stabilities of Position
589
Jonval Turbine
593
Factors for Metal Tank Stand Pipes
594
Z2I Experiments with Hollow Cylindrical Beams
600
SYSTEMS OF WATER SUPPLY Page
603
Metric Weights and Measures
612
107c Combined Flow for Fire and Domestic Services 520
614
Trigonometrical Equivalents
618
Dimensions of Bolts and Nuts
624
Safe Weights of Lead ServicePipes
630
Copyright

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Page 632 - In order to clear the throat, place the patient gently on the face, with one wrist under the forehead, that all fluid, and the tongue itself, may fall forward, and leave the entrance into the windpipe free.
Page 80 - The discharges in the upper quarter of the list are to be considered as floods, and in the lower quarter as minimum, flows. " For each of the gaugings exceeding the average of the middle half, including flood gaugings, substitute the average of the middle half of the list, and take the mean of the whole list, as thus modified, for the ordinary or average discharge, exclusive of flood-waters...
Page 34 - ... For private hose, sprinkling streets and yards: 10 gallons per capita per day during the four driest months of the year. (g) Waste, to prevent freezing of water in service pipes and house fixtures in northern cities: 10 gallons per capita per day during the three coldest months of the year.
Page 633 - Meantime, and from time to time, to excite inspiration, let the surface of the body be slapped briskly with the hand. gth. Rub the body briskly till it is dry and warm, then dash cold water upon it, and repeat the rubbing.
Page 632 - Place the patient gently on the face with one WRIST under the forehead ; [all fluids and the tongue itself then fall forwards...
Page 159 - ... added, and the bottle freely exposed to the daylight in the window of a warm room, the liquid should not become turbid, even after exposure for a week or ten days. If the water becomes turbid, it is open to grave suspicion of sewage contamination ; but if it remain clear, it is almost certainly safe.
Page 156 - The importance of this matter is underrated for two reasons : first, because of the oft-repeated assertion, made on the authority of Dr. Letheby, that "if sewage-matter be mixed with twenty times its bulk of ordinary river-water, and flow a dozen miles, there is not a particle of that sewage to be discovered by chemical means...
Page 632 - Turn the body gently, but completely, on the side and a little beyond, and then on the face, alternately ; repeating these measures deliberately, efficiently, and perseveringly, fifteen times in the minute, only...
Page 34 - For private stables, including carriage washing, when reckoned on the basis of inhabitants, 3 gallons per capita per day. (c.) For commercial and manufacturing purposes, 5 to 15 gallons per capita per day. (d.) For fountains, drinking and ornamental, 3 to 10 gallons per capita per day. (e.) For fire purposes, ^ gallon per capita per day.

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