Marcion and the Making of a Heretic

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 26, 2015 - History - 502 pages
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A comprehensive and authoritative account of the 'heretic' Marcion, this volume traces the development of the concept and language of heresy in the setting of an exploration of second-century Christian intellectual debate. Judith M. Lieu analyses accounts of Marcion by the major early Christian polemicists who shaped the idea of heresy, including Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, Tertullian, Epiphanius of Salamis, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and Ephraem Syrus. She examines Marcion's 'Gospel', 'Apostolikon', and 'Antitheses' in detail and compares his principles with those of contemporary Christian and non-Christian thinkers, covering a wide range of controversial issues: the nature of God, the relation of the divine to creation, the person of Jesus, the interpretation of Scripture, the nature of salvation, and the appropriate lifestyle of adherents. In this innovative study, Marcion emerges as a distinctive, creative figure who addressed widespread concerns within second-century Christian diversity.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
the polemical making of marcion
13
Irenaeus and the shaping of a heretic
26
Marcion through Tertullians eyes
50
The heresiological tradition
86
Theology and exegesis against Marcion
126
Marcion in Syriac dress
143
Marcions Gospel
183
Marcions other writings
270
Marcion in his secondcentury context
293
God
323
The principles of Marcions thought and their context
367
Marcion and the making of the heretic
433
Bibliography
441
Index of ancient authors and sources
471
Index of subjects
496

Marcions Apostolikon
234

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About the author (2015)

Judith M. Lieu is Lady Margaret's Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. She has written numerous books, including I, II, and III John: A Commentary (2008), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004), and Neither Jew nor Greek: Constructing Early Christianity (2002).

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