The Expiring Continent: A Narrative of Travel in Senegambia, with Observations on Native Character, the Present Condition and Future Prospects of Africa and Colonisation. With Map and Sixteen Illustrations

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W. H. Allen & Company, 1881 - Gambia - 469 pages
 

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Page i - The Expiring Continent : a narrative of travel in Senegambia, with observations on native character, the present condition and future prospects of Africa and colonisation.
Page 401 - ... and meetings for the general good are seldom held. The Europeans possess no bond of union, and avoid each other, but have not failed, with few exceptions, to gain the respect of the natives. . . .During the rains the chief part of the town is overflowed, and the people catch fish in the middle of the streets. Occasionally a crocodile from the creek makes its appearance, affording the natives considerable amusement, usually ending in its being killed near to the wineshops on the way to the cemetery....
Page 406 - ... is there scarcely known, although the exercise of the functions of such an officer could with great benefit be performed in Bathurst. The most appalling indifference to the existence of festering sewage in the midst of a town population pervades the inhabitants. Thousands of gallons of putrefying animal and vegetable refuse in uncovered, or barely covered, holes in the ground form filthy cesspools close to the dwellings and have not been emptied for years. The nauseating mixture of gases that...
Page 401 - ... makes its appearance, affording the natives considerable amusement, usually ending in its being killed near to the wineshops on the way to the cemetery. Other natives enjoy the Venetian pastime of rowing up and down the streets in boats, when the water forces its way into the barrack square to the depth of a foot. Luckily these floods soon subside, the muddy soil covered with a great coat of sand, under which the water stagnates, and becomes prejudicial to health from the air being overloaded...
Page 406 - ... streets in boats, when the water forces its way into the barrack square to the depth of a foot. Luckily these floods soon subside, the muddy soil covered with a great coat of sand, under which the water stagnates, and becomes prejudicial to health from the air being overloaded with evil odours. . . . Sanitary science is a sealed book in Bathurst and other West Coast towns, and the name of sanitary inspector is there scarcely known, although the exercise of the functions of such an officer could...
Page 398 - pretty and well kept". He also had a word or two of praise for missionary endeavour, but otherwise found little evidence of anything else except lethargy. The state of the town, he wrote, is a reflex of the apathy and listlessness of its people. Those, who have continuously lived there, scarcely recognise the place in its present condition, compared with what it was some years ago. No friendly associations exist for the advancement of the colony, and meetings for the general good are seldom held....
Page 399 - ... and listlessness of its people. Those, who have continuously lived there, scarcely recognise the place in its present condition, compared with what it was some years ago. No friendly associations exist for the advancement of the colony, and meetings for the general good are seldom held. The Europeans possess no bond of union, and avoid each other, but have not failed, with few exceptions, to gain the respect of the natives. . . .During the rains the chief part of the town is overflowed, and the...
Page 128 - It is a pleasant and instractive scene to watch a grey, reverend-looking Marabout surrounded by boys, listening attentively to his teaching, or all joining in and chanting a repetition of the lessons he gives them from the Koran, or busily engaged under his supervision in practising their writing-lessons on boards.
Page 406 - ... odours. . . . Sanitary science is a sealed book in Bathurst and other West Coast towns, and the name of sanitary inspector is there scarcely known, although the exercise of the functions of such an officer could with great benefit be performed in Bathurst. The most appalling indifference to the existence of festering sewage in the midst of a town population pervades the inhabitants. Thousands of gallons of putrefying animal and vegetable refuse in uncovered, or barely covered, holes in the ground...
Page 361 - The district is rich in minerals, especially gold, and to work the latter, attempts had been made for more than a century by the French to obtain a profitable share in working the mines, but factories formerly existing at Sansanding, and other places, met with but little success. These failures are, however, fully accounted for by the misconduct and mistakes of the managers and agents...

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