The Starchild Trilogy

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Pocket Books, 1983 - Science fiction - 442 pages

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User Review  - ansate - LibraryThing

No likable characters. Character actions don't drive the story, they are powerless. The scifi is so fantastic that it goes straight to fantasy - ghosts, teleportation by mystical beings, space ... Read full review

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User Review  - benfulton - LibraryThing

Definitely some interesting ideas here. The first book is the best one, with a convincing scientific explanation of an inertialess drive, some interesting beasts, and a good story. The world is fairly ... Read full review

Contents

The Reefs of Space
1
Starchild
157
Rogue Star
297
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

Frederik Pohl was born in New York City on November 26, 1919. More interested in writing than in school, he dropped out of high school in his senior year and took a job with a publishing company. After serving as a public relations officer in the United States Army from 1943 to 1945, he returned to publishing as copywriter for Popular Science, a literary agent for several sci-fi writers, and the editor for the magazines Galaxy and If from 1959 until 1969, with If winning three successive Hugo awards. His first published work, a poem entitled Elegy to a Dead Satellite: Luna, was printed in Amazing Stories magazine in 1937 under the pen name Elton Andrews. His first science fiction novels were published in the mid 1960's, some written in collaboration with other writers, others created alone. During his lifetime, he won over 16 major awards for his writing (much of which was published pseudonymously) including six Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards. His works include Gateway, which won the Campbell Memorial, Hugo, Locus SF, and Nebula Awards, Beyond the Blue Event Horizon, and Jem, which won the National Book Award in 1979. He also embraced blogging in his later years, using his online journal as an ongoing sequel to his autobiography, The Way the Future Was. He died on September 2, 2013 at the age 93.

Author Jack Williamson was born in Bisbee, Arizona on April 29, 1908. In the 1950's, he received both his BA and MA degress in English from Eastern New Mexico University. After receiving his PhD from the University of Colorado, he taught linguistics, the modern novel and literary criticism at Eastern New Mexico University until he retired in 1977. At the age of 20, he published his first story, The Metal Man, in a December 1928 issue of Amazing Stories. Since then he has written more than 50 novels and at least 15 short story collections. Some of his best known works are The Humanoids, The Legion of Time, Manseed, and Lifeburst. He also published numerous collaborations with fellow science fiction author Frederik Pohl. He received numerous awards including the Pilgrim Award from the Science Fiction Research Association, the Hugo Award, and the Nebula Award. He was an inaugural inductee in the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame and was named a Grand Master of Science Fiction by the Science Fiction Writers of America in 1976. He died at his home in Portales, New Mexico on November 10, 2006.

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