Mistakes Were Made (but Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts

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Harcourt, 2007 - Psychology - 292 pages
8 Reviews
"Entertaining, illuminating and--when you recognize yourself in the stories it tells--mortifying." --Wall Street Journal
 
"Every page sparkles with sharp insight and keen observation. Mistakes were made--but not in this book!" --Daniel Gilbert, author of
Stumbling on Happiness

Why do people dodge responsibility when things fall apart? Why the parade of public figures unable to own up when they screw up? Why the endless marital quarrels over who is right? Why can we see hypocrisy in others but not in ourselves? Are we all liars? Or do we really believe the stories we tell?Renowned social psychologists Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson take a compelling look into how the brain is wired for self-justification. When we make mistakes, we must calm the cognitive dissonance that jars our feelings of self-worth. And so we create fictions that absolve us of responsibility, restoring our belief that we are smart, moral, and right--a belief that often keeps us on a course that is dumb, immoral, and wrong.Backed by years of research and delivered in lively, energetic prose, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) offers a fascinating explanation of self-deception--how it works, the harm it can cause, and how we can overcome it.

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Could Change Your Life

User Review  - Slizeski - Borders

This book was key to the solving of a four year family battle. It was successfully mediated (the third attempt) just this past weekend, and fate had me meet one of the authors (Carol Tavris) at a ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Interesting and informative, a really important book, I think everyone should read it!

About the author (2007)

CAROL TAVRIS is a social psychologist and author of Anger and The Mismeasure of Woman. She has written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Scientific American, and many other publications. She lives in Los Angeles.

ELLIOT ARONSON is a social psychologist and author of The Social Animal. The recipient of many awards for teaching, scientific research, writing, and contributions to society, he is a professor emeritus at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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