The Red Cross: Its Origin, International Charcter, Development and History

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American National Red Cross, 1895 - Red Cross - 40 pages
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Page 19 - Washington, unchallenged by the closest stickler for routine and red tape. She met the wounded as they poured in from Virginia, and she attended them upon the field. Military trains were at her service. She was present at the battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run.
Page 13 - ... the central society being the medium of communication for all with the seat of war and with medical authorities. It Is through this central society that the work is recognized by government. Second, that the societies shall in time of peace keep themselves constantly prepared for war, thus securing permanency of organization. Third, that during war their succor shall be extended to foe equally with friend, whenever necessary. Fourth, that societies whose countries are at peace may send relief...
Page 9 - Article 5, with the view to quiet the fears of the inhabitants in the vicinity of a battle, who often flee in terror, as well as to secure their assistance, and the comfort of their homes for the care of the wounded, offers military protection, and certain exemptions to all who shall entertain and care for the wounded in their houses. Article 6 binds the parties contracting the Treaty not only to give the requisite care and treatment to all sick and wounded who shall fall into their hands, but to...
Page 17 - Relief was sent from one or another of these stations as was needed. The state afforded free transport, and the voluntary contributions of the people kept up the supplies of sanitary material, so that there was never any lack or danger of failure. With the government transports, whether by land or water, there went always the agents of the Red Cross, protected by their badges and flag, to wait on the invoices, hasten their progress, see to their being kept in good order, and properly •delivered...
Page 28 - It is a perpetual sanctuary against 28 invading armies, -and will be so respected and held sacred by the military powers of the world. Forty nations are pledged to hold all material and stores of the Red Cross, and all its followers, neutral in war, and free to go and come as their duties require. "While its business headquarters will...
Page 15 - ... of thalers were collected, and the other states of Germany were not behind. So munificently did the people bestow their aid, that large storehouses were provided in Berlin and in the provinces for its reception, and at the central depot in Berlin two hundred paid persons, besides a large number of volunteers, and nearly three hundred ladies and misses were employed in classifying, parceling, packing up, and dispatching the goods.
Page 9 - ... protection, and certain exemptions to all who shall entertain and care for the wounded in their houses. Article 6 binds the parties contracting the Treaty not only to give the requisite care and treatment to all sick and wounded who shall fall into their hands, but to see to it that their misfortunes shall not be aggravated by the prospect of banishment or imprisonment ; they shall not be retained as prisoners of war, but if circumstances admit, may be given up immediately after the action, to...
Page 15 - Conference of 1863 she had been acting on the rule of preparation, and now found herself in readiness for all emergencies. The Central Committee of Berlin was flooded with contributions from the provincial committees. In the eight provinces of Prussia 4,000,000 of thalers were collected, and the other states of Germany were not behind. So munificently did the people bestow their aid, that large storehouses were provided in Berlin and in the provinces for its reception, and at the central depot in...
Page 2 - We are screened evermore," in the words of Emerson, " from premature ideas. Our eyes are holdeii that we can not see things that stare us in the face until the mind (and the time; is ripened.
Page 35 - Italy were types of military cruelty, medical insufficiency, and needless suffering which shocked the world. Out of the smouldering ashes of these memories rose the clear, steady flame of the Red Cross; so bright and beautiful that it drew the gaze of all mankind; so broad that it reached the farthest bound of the horizon; so peaceful, wise, harmless and fraternal that all nations and sects, the Christian and the Jew, the Protestant and the Catholic, the soldier and the philanthropist, the war-maker...

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