The history of England, from the earliest times to the death of George II.

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G.G. & J. Robinson, 1800 - Great Britain
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Page 140 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people; and by the advice of jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom, has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 241 - French protestants, confined in the prisons and galleys for their religion, was not the least meritorious. For the emperor it was stipulated, that he should possess the kingdom of Naples, the duchy of Milan, and the Netherlands.
Page 106 - He went openly to mass with all the ensigns of his dignity, and even sent one Caryl as his agent to Rome to make submissions to the pope, and to pave the way for the re-admission of ; England into the bosom of the catholic church.
Page 304 - ... would be shut up. The people, however, were raised into such a ferment, that the parliament-house was surrounded with multitudes, who intimidated the ministry, and compelled them to drop the design. The miscarriage of the Bill was celebrated with public rejoicings in London and Westminster, and the minister was burned in effigy by the populace of London.
Page 14 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 243 - The lords, taking into consideration the state of the nation, resolved upon addresses to the queen, desiring they might know what steps had been taken for removing the pretender from the dominions of the duke of Lorraine...
Page 262 - ... make good the two articles for high treason, the earl of Oxford would forfeit both life and estate, and there would be an end of the matter ; whereas, to proceed on the method proposed by the commons would draw the trial on to a prodigious length.
Page 132 - Helvoet-Sluice, with a fleet of near five hundred vessels, and an army of above fourteen thousand men. He first encountered a storm...
Page 229 - ... of intelligence; and to have pocketed a deduction of two and a half per cent, from the pay of the foreign troops maintained by England. It...
Page 79 - I would not have," said a noble peer, in the debate on this bill, " so much as a popish man or a popish woman to remain here ; not so much as a popish dog or a popish bitch ; not so much as a popish cat to pur or mew about the king.

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