A Canyon Voyage: The Narrative of the Second Powell Expedition Down the Green-Colorado River from Wyoming, and the Explorations on Land, in the Years 1871 and 1872

Front Cover
G.P. Putnam's sons, 1908 - America - 277 pages
5 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
1
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: A Canyon Voyage: The Narrative of the Second Powell Expedition down the Green-Colorado River from Wyoming, and the Explorations on Land, in the Years 1871 and 1872

User Review  - C Miller - Goodreads

Read this on a trip to Utah and Colorado, which included a white water rafting trip and a visit to the Grand Canyon. A vivid accounting. The second voyage had almost as many challenges as the first exploration. A great book to read and even better to read while there. Read full review

Review: A Canyon Voyage: The Narrative of the Second Powell Expedition down the Green-Colorado River from Wyoming, and the Explorations on Land, in the Years 1871 and 1872

User Review  - Ellen Grabarek - Goodreads

I felt that it drug a bit, though it was an interesting read Read full review

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 138 - OFTEN I think of the beautiful town That is seated by the sea ; Often in thought go up and down The pleasant streets of that dear old town, And my youth comes back to me. And a verse of a Lapland song Is haunting my memory still : " A boy's will is the wind's will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.
Page 142 - FLOW gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes, Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise ; My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream, Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream. Thou stock-dove whose echo resounds thro...
Page 97 - Full-faced above the valley stood the moon ; And like a downward smoke, the slender stream Along the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. A land of streams ! some, like a downward smoke, Slow-dropping veils of thinnest lawn, did go ; And some thro' wavering lights and shadows broke, Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam below.
Page 148 - WE were not many, — we who stood Before the iron sleet that day ; Yet many a gallant spirit would Give half his years if but he could Have been with us at Monterey. Now here, now there, the shot it hailed In deadly drifts of fiery spray, Yet not a single soldier quailed When wounded comrades round them wailed Their dying shout at Monterey. And on, still on our column kept, Through walls of flame, its withering way ; Where...
Page i - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 73 - I WILL sing you a song of that beautiful land, The far away home of the soul, Where no storms ever beat on the glittering strand While the years of eternity roll.
Page 172 - But the beating of my own heart Was all the sound I heard. He came not — no, he came not! The night came on alone...
Page 137 - O wad some power the giftie gie us, To see oursels as others see us!
Page 97 - And some thro' wavering lights and shadows broke, Bo1ling a slumbrous sheet of foam below. They saw the gleaming river seaward flow From the inner land ; far off, three...
Page 138 - Said old Floyd Ireson, for his hard heart, Tarred and feathered and carried in a cart By the women of Marblehead! Then the wife of the skipper lost at sea Said, "God has touched him! Why should we?

Bibliographic information