Transactions of the Sixth International Congress on Tuberculosis, Volume 8

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Fell, 1908
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Page 128 - From the experiments here recorded we believe that we are justified in concluding: 1. That after repeated intravenous injections of cultures of tubercle bacilli from human sputum the resistance of young cattle to virulent tubercle bacilli of bovine origin may be increased to such an extent that they are not injured by inoculation with quantities of such cultures that are capable of causing death or extensive infection of cattle not similarly protected.
Page 110 - In color it is pleasant to see; as a medicine it seems to lubricate the windpipe, to clean, as if with a feather, the bronchi, and to bring off phlegm, improve the breathing, and facilitate the discharges downwards. To ulcers it is a sweet medicine, and milder than anything eleo.
Page 170 - KNOPF. Pulmonary Tuberculosis. Its Modern Prophylaxis and Treatment in Special Institutions and at Home.
Page 112 - It ought never to be employed in the treatment of consumption except to remove inflammation or active determinations of blood, with which the disease may be complicated; beyond this its operation can only tend to a useless loss of strength.
Page 84 - The only country that possesses a considerable number of special hospitals for tuberculous patients is England, and there can be no doubt that the diminution of tuberculosis in England, which is much greater than in any other country, is greatly due to this circumstance.
Page 261 - STAND ALONE. For this reason the dispensary cannot afford to be an isolated institution. Its strength and success will depend, first, on the thoroughness of its internal organization, and, second, on the closeness of its relationships with other institutions concerned in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Its methods must be simple, direct, and businesslike. It need not be an expensive concern. What is chiefly required is a thorough grasp by those in charge of the dispensary of its purposes...
Page 112 - We may be well assured that a disease is irremediable, when we find employed in its treatment almost every known medicament, however different or even opposite in effect ; when we see new remedies proposed every day, and old ones revived, after having lain long in merited oblivion ; when, in short, we find no plan constant but that of giving palliatives, and no means persevered in, but such as are proper for fulfilling indications purely symptomatic.
Page 100 - York a similar story has to be told. Dr. Hermann Biggs (190304, p. 191) says: " There has been a more rapid fall in the tuberculosis death-rate in New York city than in any great city in the world, and this notwithstanding the fact that the conditions in many respects are much more unfavorable, because of the very dense population in the great tenement-house districts of the city, and the large element of foreign-born population. It should be remembered that in no city of the world is there such...
Page 97 - Thus in Glasgow, which has 26 times as large a proportion of one-roomed tenement dwellings as Belfast, and 52 times as many persons in its oneroomed tenements with five or more occupants, the death-rate from phthisis, instead of being higher, is 43 per cent. lower, than that of Belfast. This does not imply that in a given town the death-rate from phthisis is not higher in the smaller and more overcrowded tenements. Abundant statistics show this to be the case. But it is clear, from the above table,...
Page 211 - But when the tuberculin tests in 1891 and 1892 showed that, in herds in which for years cases of the disease had been found, a majority of the cows (often 80 to 100 per cent) reacted, it was not clearly understood that these great numbers meant simply that the majority of the cows were infected, but by no means signified that the reacting cows were sentenced to death and after a longer or shorter period would succumb to tuberculosis. This great number of reacting cows made the farmer despair. He...

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