Blood, Class and Empire: The Enduring Anglo-American Relationship

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PublicAffairs, Mar 19, 2004 - History - 398 pages
3 Reviews
Since the end of the Cold War so-called experts have been predicting the eclipse of America's "special relationship" with Britain. But as events have shown, especially in the wake of 9/11, the political and cultural ties between America and Britain have grown stronger. Blood, Class and Empire examines the dynamics of this relationship, its many cultural manifestations—the James Bond series, PBS "brit Kitsch," Rudyard Kipling—and explains why it still persists. Contrarian, essayist and polemicist Christopher Hitchens notes that while the relationship is usually presented as a matter of tradition, manners, and common culture, sanctified by wartime alliance, the special ingredient is empire; transmitted from an ancien regime that has tried to preserve and renew itself thereby. England has attempted to play Greece to the American Rome, but ironically having encouraged the United States to become an equal partner in the business of empire, Britain found itself supplanted.
 

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User Review  - MikeFutcher - LibraryThing

Blood, Class and Empire is a densely argued and slow-paced historical review from the usually very readable Christopher Hitchens. I was surprised, given Hitchens' usual ready wit, choice quotations ... Read full review

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User Review  - Gregorio_Roth - LibraryThing

Hitchens seems to have a conversation with you; as if I was an equal which of course I am not. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Greece to Their Rome
22
Brit Kitsch
38
The Bard of Empires
63
Blood Relations
98
Vox Americana
127
From Love to Hate and Back Again
152
The Churchill Cult
180
Churchills Revenge
239
Imperial Receivership
252
Discordant Intimacy
292
The Bond of Intelligence
319
Nuclear Jealousies
340
Conclusion
359
Bibliographic Note
373
Index
381

FDRs Victory Churchills Defeat
200

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About the author (2004)

Christopher Hitchens is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair. His numerous books include Letters to a Young Contrarian and Why Orwell Matters.