Hollywood

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Mar 17, 2009 - Fiction - 248 pages
11 Reviews

From iconic tortured artist/everyman Charles Bukowski, Hollywood is the fictionalization of his experience adapting his novel Barfly into a movie by the same name.

Henry Chinaski, Bukowski’s alter-ego, is pushed to translate a semi-autobiographical book into a screenplay for John Pinchot.  He reluctantly agrees, and is thrust into the otherworld called Hollywood, with its parade of eccentric and maddening characters: producers, artists, actors and actresses, film executives and journalists.  In this world, the artistry of books and film is lost to the dollar, and Chinaski struggles to keep his footing in the tangle of cons that comprise movie making.

Hollywood is Dirty Old Man Bukowski at his most lucid.  It overflows with curses, sex, and alcohol.  And through it all, or from it all, Bukowski finds flashes of truth about the human condition. 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
5
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MikeFutcher - LibraryThing

A good addition to the Charles Bukowski legend, Hollywood sees the author's avatar Henry Chinaski now finally successful and writing a screenplay about his life. This screenplay would be made into the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - the.ken.petersen - LibraryThing

I do admire Bukowski's sparse writing style; not a word is wasted but, for me, this book fails to live up to its blurb. The reverse of the paperback edition promises, "There are many scandalous books ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2009)

Charles Bukowski is one of America’s best-known contemporary writers of poetry and prose and, many would claim, its most influential and imitated poet. He was born in 1920 in Andernach, Germany, to an American soldier father and a German mother, and brought to the United States at the age of two. He was raised in Los Angeles and lived there for more than fifty years. He died in San Pedro, California, on March 9, 1994, at the age of seventy-three, shortly after completing his last novel, Pulp.

Bibliographic information