Droidmaker: George Lucas and the Digital Revolution

Front Cover
Triad Publishing Company, 2006 - Performing Arts - 518 pages
3 Reviews
The inside story of George Lucas, his intensely private company, and their work to revolutionize filmmaking. In the process, they made computer history. Discover the birth of Pixar, digital video editing, videogame avatars, high definition television, THX sound, and a host of other icons of the media age. Lucas and his friend Francis Coppola were not only central to the renaissance of independent film, but they both played pivotal roles in the universe of entertainment technologies we see everyday. Book jacket.

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Droidmaker: George Lucas and the digital revolution

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Before Star Wars creator George Lucas became one of today's most innovative filmmakers, he was just a geek with visionary ideas and talent. A filmmaker and educator, Rubin once worked in the computer ... Read full review

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I really loved reading this book. It not only gave me a chronological time frame of the Star Wars films, but it gave me a full film history. I learned about Spielberg's film history, and the creation of his production companies along with the other top companies like Pixar. You will learn about all the behind the scenes info and what they did during their down time. Granted the terminology is a bit tough to swallow for people who don't live with a computer geek, I found it very thrilling and love my computer geek dad for buying it for me.
One reader to another: Ronald Bergan wrote "Francis Ford Coppola: The Making of His Movies" which made a great companion piece to Droidmaker. It will fill in some history gaps.
 

About the author (2006)

Michael Rubin is an entrepreneur, editor, and educator dedicated to empowering people with new media tools. In 1985 he joined the team George Lucas assembled to introduce cutting-edge technology to Hollywood. Michael has designed nonlinear editing tools and supported feature films and television projects such as "The Twilight Zone" and "Sheltering Sky." In 1991 he published Nonlinear, the first book on computer editing for film and video, now in it's fourth edition. His other books include The Little Digital Video Book and Making Movies with Final Cut Express (both Peachpit Press). He is also the co-founder and CEO of Petroglyph Ceramic Lounge.

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