Dismembering L_hui: A History of the Hawaiian Nation to 1887

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University of Hawaii Press, 2002 - History - 310 pages
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Jonathan Osorio investigates the effects of Western law on the national identity of Native Hawaiians in this impressive political history of the Kingdom of Hawai'i from the onset of constitutional government in 1840 to the Bayonet Constitution of 1887, which effectively placed political power in the kingdom in the hands of white businessmen. Making extensive use of legislative texts, contemporary newspapers, and important works by Hawaiian historians and others, Osorio plots the course of events that transformed Hawai'i from a traditional subsistence economy to a modern nation, taking into account the many individuals nearly forgotten by history who wrestled with each new political and social change. A final poignant chapter links past events with the struggle for Hawaiian sovereignty today.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
24
V
44
VI
74
VII
105
IX
145
X
193
XI
250
XII
261
XIII
289
XIV
293
XV
299
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Page 2 - ... who shall have paid his taxes; who shall have attained the age of twenty years, and shall have been domiciled in the Kingdom for one year immediately preceding the election, and shall know how to read and write...

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