The vicar of Wakefield

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Renger, 1823 - 173 pages
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User Review  - fhudnell - LibraryThing

What I thought was going to be a sweet, charming chronicle of the life of a vicar and his family took a definite maudlin turn which I was not expecting. Then it turned into an absolute glut of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Dreesie - LibraryThing

What a struggle. I did not enjoy this at all, and even though it is under 200 pages it took me 2 full weeks to read. The vicar is not a nice man (he dumps out his daughters' beauty concoctions, and ... Read full review

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Page 115 - ... could be bought that would turn to account when disposed of again in London. Such curiosities on the way as could be seen for nothing, he was ready enough to look at ; but if the sight of them was to be paid for, he usually asserted that he had been told they were not worth seeing. He never paid a bill that he would not observe, how amazingly expensive travelling was; and all this, though he was not yet twenty-one.
Page 82 - ELEGY ON THE DEATH OF A MAD ,DOG. Good people all of every sort, Give ear unto my song, And if you find it wondrous short, It cannot hold you long. In Islington there was a man, Of whom the world might say, That still a godly race he ran, Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes ! The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes. And in that town a dog was found...
Page 2 - We had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo ; all our adventures were by the fire-side, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.
Page 34 - Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, ' ' To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom. "Here to the houseless child of want My door is open still; And though my portion is but scant, I give it with good will.
Page 83 - Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes; The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes. And in that town a dog was found, As many dogs there be, Both mongrel, puppy, whelp, and hound, And curs of low degree.
Page 35 - No flocks that range the valley free, To slaughter I condemn: Taught by that Power that pities me, I learn to pity them : "But from the mountain's grassy side A guiltless feast I bring; A scrip with herbs and fruits supplied, And water from the spring. "Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego ; All earth-born cares are wrong; Man wants but little here below, Nor wants that little long.
Page 57 - Between ourselves, three pounds, five shillings and twopence is no bad day's work. Come, let us have it then." "I have brought back no money," cried Moses again. "I have laid it all out in a bargain, and here it is...
Page 37 - Each hour a mercenary crowd With richest proffers strove ; Among the rest young Edwin bow'd, But never talk'd of love. " In humble, simplest habit clad, No wealth nor power had he ; Wisdom and worth were all he had, But these were all to me.
Page 36 - The crackling faggot flies. But nothing could a charm impart To soothe the stranger's woe; For grief was heavy at his heart, And tears began to flow. His rising cares the Hermit spied, With answering care opprest : " And whence, unhappy youth," he cried, " The sorrows of thy breast ? " From better habitations spurn'd, Reluctant dost thou rove?
Page 38 - Till quite dejected with my scorn He left me to my pride ; And sought a solitude forlorn, In secret, where he died.

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