Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

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User Review  - jculkin - LibraryThing

Skip it and read Hume, who says the same stuff more quickly, takes it further, and doesn't go god-mad. Or if you must have a taste, only suffer the first dialogue - it's downhill from there. This ... Read full review

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User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

Berkeley's Three Dialogues were written to present the author's philosophy in an easy to digest format, as his previous work containing these views did not have as big an impact as he had expected ... Read full review

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Page 11 - Sensible Things ? Hyl. Those things which are perceived by the senses. Can you imagine that I mean anything else ? Phil. Pardon me, Hylas, if I am desirous clearly to apprehend your notions, since this may much shorten our inquiry. Suffer me then to ask you this farther question. Are those things only perceived by the senses which are perceived immediately ? Or, may those things properly be said to be sensible which are perceived mediately, or not without the intervention of others ? Hyl.
Page 97 - The question between the materialists and me is not whether things have a real existence out of the mind of this or that person, but, whether they have an absolute existence, distinct from being perceived by God, and exterior to all minds.
Page 30 - ... ones of the philosophers. It is not my business to dispute about them ; only I would advise you to bethink yourself, whether, considering the inquiry we are upon, it be prudent for you to affirm — the red and blue which we see are not real colours, but certain unknown motions ana figures, which no man ever did or can see, are truly so.
Page 102 - What say you to this ? Since, according to you, men judge of the reality of things by their senses, how can a man be mistaken in thinking the moon a plain lucid surface, about a foot in diameter; or a square tower, seen at a distance, round; or an oar, with one end in the water, crooked?
Page 90 - I do not pretend to frame any hypothesis at all '. I am of a vulgar cast, simple enough to believe my senses, and leave things as I find them.
Page 65 - Besides, is there no difference between saying, THERE IS A GOD, THEREFORE HE PERCEIVES ALL THINGS; and saying, SENSIBLE THINGS DO REALLY EXIST; AND, IF THEY REALLY EXIST, THEY ARE NECESSARILY PERCEIVED BY AN INFINITE MIND: THEREFORE THERE IS AN INFINITE MIND OR GOD?
Page 14 - I tell you, the reason is plainly the same in respect of both : they are both perceived by sense; nay, the greater degree of heat is more sensibly perceived; and consequently, if there is any difference, we are more certain of its real existence than we can can be of the reality of a lesser degree.
Page 30 - ... motion, and in various manners reflected from the different surfaces of outward objects to the eyes, communicate different motions to the optic nerves ; which, being propagated to the brain, cause therein various impressions; and these are attended with the sensations of red, blue, yellow, &c.
Page 65 - I and all Christians hold ; nay, and all others too who believe there is a God, and that He knows and comprehends all things. Phil. Aye, but here lies the difference. Men commonly believe that all things are known or perceived by God, because they believe the being of a God ; whereas I, on the other side, immediately and necessarily conclude the being of a God, because all sensible things must be perceived by him.

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