The American Machinist Shop Note Book: A Collection of Articles

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American machinist, McGraw-Hill book Company, Incorporated, sole selling agents, 1919 - Machine-shop practice - 301 pages
 

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Page 65 - ... bending in this next section, while sufficient upsetting of the material takes place at the same time so that there is no flattening down of the outside, and the pipe holds up to its full form. This same procedure is continued for one section following another, and the pipe rolls up into forms as shown at J, where in this case the shaded portion K, indicates the place where the bending is taking place. Care must be used that the bend does not run out of a true plane, and if there be any tendency...
Page 273 - Add together the diameter of the roll and the diameter of the center hole, both in inches ; multiply by the number of coils in the roll and by 0.131. The result will be the approximate length in feet regardless of the thickness of the belt.
Page 63 - Bending block and pins. This is a simple method, but requires a careful workman to get a smooth job, and though adaptable to the largest sizes of pipe, may require a tedious amount of work. Two pins are required for the necessary leverage to pull the pipe around. The plate is desirable for keeping the bend in a true plane. In bending, the pipe is heated in a small spot at a time on the inside of the bend, as shown in the shaded portion at E. If the heat extend around the outside of the pipe...
Page 64 - ... tedious amount of work. Two pins are required for the necessary leverage to pull the pipe around. The plate is desirable for keeping the bend in a true plane. In bending, the pipe is heated in a small spot at a time on the inside of the bend, as shown in the shaded portion at E. If the heat extend around the outside of the pipe, this should be chilled with water immediately before bending, the object being to keep the outside cold to prevent flattening the pipe while the pressure of the bending...
Page 64 - ... pipe can be heated at a time and should the pressure cause the inside to start to kink at any point, that place must be immediately chilled with water, and the bending continued further along. On account of the constant shifting of the heat on a very small portion at a time, the use of an oil torch for heating is a great advantage, as it saves carrying the pipe to and from a forge, but the latter can be used if necessary. Ques. How may pipes be bent by hand without the use of special tools? Pipe...
Page 232 - The platen has in the center a hole 11V4 in. in diameter, for cuttings to drop into and also to clear the boring bar and tool. The detail B shows the main sliding jaws of the chuck; there are two such and they are moved apart or together up against the sides of the driving box, which are next to the driving-box shoes. These two jaws are planed on the bottom on two places 4 in. wide and 1 in. high. They are then beveled at a 30-deg.
Page 145 - No clapper box is needed, as the cutter is placed just in front of the shank and thrust collar. A hole through the shank near the lower end receives the tool bar, the shank being split for some distance past the hole to allow for clamping the bar by means of the capscrew shown. A setscrew and hardened rod inserted from the rear end of the bar clamps the tool, which can be set to any desired radius by measuring over the bar with a micrometer.
Page 203 - For a 60 deg. thread it will be seen from the right triangle ABC that the assumed wire has its center a distance D nearer the thread axis than the center of the actual wire. The point of contact K between the micrometer and the actual wire has to advance, in order to get to a similar point on the assumed wire, this distance D plus the shortening of the radius ^-, or a total distance % D.
Page 65 - ... the bending is taking place. Care must be used that the bend does not run out of a true plane, and if there be any tendency toward doing so. the work must be laid on a face plate or anvil and trued up. In working with this method and that of fig. 8,296, the smith must work up to an inside template which has been made up for the radius of the inside of the bend, using care to keep each added bend close to the template size to save any unnecessary bending or straightening (A
Page 159 - Many flat gages are now employed that invariably have to be scraped to precision before hardening, as there is no other available way that is profitable. This necessitates a scraping tool ground to required accuracy, even though the gages are ground and lapped. Precision tools in reality are gages themselves, and require the skill of a gagemaker to produce an accurate job. Fig.

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