Divine Predestination and Fore-knowledg: Consistent with the Freedom of Man's Will. A Sermon Preach'd at Christ-Church, Dublin; May 15. 1709. ... By His Grace, William Lord Archbishop of Dublin, Volume 1

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Printed at Dublin, and reprinted at London, for J. Baker, 1709 - 36 pages
 

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Page 27 - Say unto them, As I live, saith the Lord GOD, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that the wicked turn from his way and live: turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways; for why will ye die, O house of Israel?
Page 23 - The common use of figures is to represent things that are otherwise very well known, in such a manner as may magnify or lessen, heighten or adorn, the ideas we have of them; and the design of putting' them in this foreign dress, as we may call it, is to move our passions and engage our fancies more effectually than the true and naked view of them is apt to do, or perhaps ought. And from hence it too often happens that these figures are employed to deceive us, and make us think better or worse of...
Page 11 - ... his senses, we do it by comparing it to something that already has, by offering him some similitude, resemblance, or analogy, to help his conception. As for example, to give a man a notion of a country to which he is a stranger, and to make him apprehend its bounds and situation, we produce a map to him, and by that he obtains as much knowledge of it as serves him for his present purpose.
Page 7 - ... all those acts, to the effecting of which these parts in us are instrumental: that is, he can converse with men as well as if he had a tongue and mouth; he can discern all that we do or say as perfectly as if he had eyes and ears; he can reach us as well as if he had hands and feet; he has as true and substantial a being as if he had a body; and he is as truly present everywhere as if that body were infinitely extended.
Page 10 - ... that they are quite of another nature, and that we have no proper notion of them, any more than a man born blind has of sight and colours...
Page 23 - ... may call it, is to move our passions and engage our fancies more effectually than the true and naked view of them is apt to do, or perhaps ought. And from hence it too often happens that these figures are employed to deceive us, and make us think better or worse of things than they really deserve. But the analogies and similitudes that the holy Scriptures, or our own reason, frame of divine things, are of another nature: the use of them is to give us some notion of things whereof we have no direct...
Page 6 - We ought to remember that the descriptions which we frame to ourselves of God, or of the divine attributes, are not taken from any direct or immediate perceptions that we have of him or them, but from some observations we have made of his works, and from the consideration of those qualifications that we conceive would enable us to perform the like. Thus...
Page 8 - But it does not follow from hence that any of these are more properly and literally in God, after the manner that they are in us, than hands or eyes, than mercy, love, or hatred are...
Page 17 - Serif <c tvre literally; who imagines him to be a " mighty King that fits in Heaven, and has the * Earth for his Footftool; that at the fame <( time has...
Page 17 - Commands; that has a great Love and Favour for fuch as diligently obey his Orders, and is in a Rage and Fury againft the Difobedient: Could any one doubt...

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