Living with Peril: Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Nuclear Weapons

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 1997 - Political Science - 461 pages
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Living with Peril explains in detail how the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations adapted to the reality of a Soviet nuclear force capable of destroying the United States and against which there was no effective defense. Wenger illuminates the development, implementation, and evolution of U.S. government policies designed to avoid war and to respond to the vulnerability of nuclear destruction. Drawing from a wealth of sources, Wenger provides an insightful and original perspective on the origins of cold war nuclear diplomacy. This is crucial reading for students and scholars of international relations, peace and conflict studies, and diplomatic history.
  

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Contents

The Integration of Nuclear Weapons into American National
13
The Impact of the Strategic Nuclear Balance on Policy
49
The Impact of the Thermonuclear Revolution on Policy
85
A Delicate Balance
105
Buying Time with Tactical Nuclear
123
Does Relative Strength Matter?
145
Eisenhower Nuclear Weapons and Policy at the End of
173
A Strategy of Multiple Options
181
How Political
241
The Impact of the Nuclear Danger
273
Lessons of the Cuban Missile Crisis
305
Conclusions
313
Notes
323
Bibliography
439
Index
455
About the Author
463

Example of SelfDeterrence or Successful
197

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About the author (1997)

Andreas Wenger is deputy director of the Center for Security Studies and Conflict Research at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

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