New Way to Pay Old Debts: A Comedy, Adapted to the Stage

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theatre, 1810 - 77 pages
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Page 52 - To my wish: we are private. I come not to make offer with my daughter A certain portion, — that were poor and trivial : In one word, I pronounce all that is mine, In lands or leases, ready coin or goods, With her, my lord, comes to you; nor shall you have One motive to induce you to believe I live too long, since every year I'll add Something unto the heap, which shall be yours too. Lov. You are a right kind father.
Page 23 - Well. By this light I think he's mad. Mar. Mad ! had you ta'en compassion on yourself, You long since had been mad. Well. You have ta'en a course, Between you and my venerable uncle, To make me so.
Page 77 - I redeem it Some noble way, I am but half made up. It is a time of action. If your lordship Will please to confer a company upon me In your command, I doubt not in my service To my king and country but I shall do something That may make me right again. Lov. Your suit is granted, And you loved for the motion. Well. [Coming forward] Nothing wants then But your allowance...
Page 54 - For though I do contemn report myself, As a mere sound, I still will be so tender Of what concerns you, in all points of honour, That the immaculate whiteness of your fame, Nor your unquestioned integrity, Shall e'er be sullied with one taint or spot That may take from your innocence and candour.
Page 54 - I write nil ultra to my proudest hopes. As for possessions, and annual rents, Equivalent to maintain you in the port Your noble birth and present state requires, I do remove that burthen from your shoulders, And take it on mine own : for, though I ruin The country to supply your riotous waste, The scourge of prodigals, want, shall never find you.
Page 22 - And therefore, I'll not have a chambermaid ; That ties her shoes, or any meaner office, But such whose fathers were right worshipful. 'Tis a rich man's pride ! there having ever been More than a feud, a strange antipathy, Between us and true gentry.
Page 24 - Mar. With choice, no doubt, of dogwhips Why, dost thou ever hope to pass her porter? Well. 'Tis not far off, go with me; trust thine own eyes. Mar. Troth, in my hope, or my assurance rather, To see thee curvet...
Page 14 - Sir, it is her will, Which we, that are her servants, ought to serve, And not dispute. Howe'er, you are nobly welcome; And, if you please to stay, that you may think so, There came, not six days since, from Hull, a pipe Of rich Canary, which shall spend itself For my lady's honour. GREEDY. Is it of the right race?
Page 49 - And what is more, unfold my nature to you. We worldly men, when we see friends, and kinsmen, Past hope sunk in their fortunes, lend no hand To lift...

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