Collections of the Maine Historical Society

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The Society, 1890 - Maine
 

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Collections and Proceedings of the Maine Historical Society - Second Series, Vol. IX

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Page 156 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States and admitted as soon as possible according to the principles of the Federal Constitution to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States; and in the mean time they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the Religion which they profess.
Page 196 - The heroes' sepulchre. Rest on, embalmed and sainted dead! Dear as the blood ye gave ; No impious footstep here shall tread The herbage of your grave; Nor shall your glory be forgot While Fame her record keeps, Or Honor points the hallowed spot Where Valor proudly sleeps.
Page 348 - ... among these men are to be found the brightest specimens and the chief benefactors of mankind! It is they that keep awake the finer parts of our souls ; that give us better aims than power or pleasure, and withstand the total sovereignty of Mammon in this earth. They are the vanguard in the march of mind ; the intellectual Backwoodsmen, reclaiming from the idle wilderness new territories for the thought and the activity of their happier brethren.
Page 308 - The glory of this latter house shall be greater than the former, saith the Lord of hosts: and in this place will I give peace, saith the Lord of hosts.
Page 156 - And provided, That the further introduction of slavery or involuntary servitude be prohibited, except for the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been [duly] convicted; and that all children born within the said State, after the admission thereof into the Union, shall be free at the age of twenty-five years.
Page 106 - They went where duty seemed to call, They scarcely asked the reason why ; They only knew they could but die, And death was not the worst of all ! Of man for man the sacrifice, All that was theirs to give they gave.
Page 30 - France. 2. Resolved, That it is expedient to prohibit by law the admission into the ports of the United States of all public or private armed or unarmed ships or vessels belonging to Great Britain or France, or to any other of the belligerent powers having in force orders or decrees violating the lawful commerce and neutral rights of the United States...
Page 29 - The instructions to our ministers, with respect to the different belligerents, were necessarily modified with a reference to their different circumstances, and to the condition annexed by law to the executive power of suspension, requiring a degree of security to our commerce which would not result from a repeal of the decrees of France. Instead of a pledge, therefore...
Page 49 - The reflection on my situation, and that of this army, produces many an unhappy hour when all around me are wrapped in sleep. Few people know the predicament we are in, on a thousand accounts ; fewer still will believe, if any disaster happens to these lines, from what cause it flows.
Page 156 - Provided, That the further introduction of slavery or involuntary servitude be prohibited, except for the punishment of crimes whereof the party shall have been duly convicted ; and that all children born within the said State after the admission thereof into the Union shall be free, but may be held to service until the age of twenty-five years.

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